Simone and her daughter Khayla in hiding at a safe house outside of Kingston, Jamaica. Image by Micah Fink. Jamaica, 2009.

"The Abominable Crime," filmmaker Micah Fink's Pulitzer Center-supported documentary exploring homophobia in Jamaica, screens on June 25 at Frameline37, the San Francisco International LGBT Film Festival.

Frameline37 summarizes the focus of "The Abominable Crime" on its website and offers a trailer of the 60-minute film. From Frameline37.org:

The joyous sound of Bob Marley’s “One Love” is a theme song of Caribbean tourism—but the reality of Jamaica’s homophobic culture is more accurately represented by dancehall anthems of hate, such as Buju Banton’s “Boom Bye Bye.” In fact, these attitudes are widely and zealously celebrated—and demonstrated through the country’s violent actions and archaic laws.

The Abominable Crime follows Simone, a lesbian mother, and Maurice, a gay human rights activist, as they navigate the conflict of loving their homeland and wanting to stay alive. Simone is seeking asylum after getting shot in front of her daughter and knows her time is limited. Maurice is used to living his life as an LGBT/HIV activist, but he is put in more danger once his marriage to a Canadian man is publicized. His husband wants them to stay in Canada, but Maurice feels a sense of duty to the cause and his country.

Filled with interviews with Jamaican students, government officials, and clergymen, all of whom preach hate under the guise of “Christian principles,” this film is a critical reminder that, for all of the battles fought in the U.S. over LGBT rights, they are a global issue, and some of our neighboring sisters and brothers have it much worse. Filmmaker Micah Fink crafts a poignant story of hope and a tribute to the many who courageously fight for change every day.

Tuesday, June 25
7:00 pm
Roxie Theater
3117 16th Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

Please see the frameline37 website for more information and to purchase tickets.

Project

Jamaica has the reputation of being one of the most violently anti-gay countries on earth. Male homosexual acts are criminalized – and can be punished with up to 10 years of hard time in prison. While this law is not actively enforced, it is widely seen as a bulwark against immorality.

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