Pulitzer Center Update

This Week: Saving 1,000 ISIS Slaves

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Mirza Dinnayi, a Yazidi activist and humanitarian, helped the German state of Baden-Württemberg transport more than 1,000 survivors of ISIS slavery to Germany for medical and psychological treatment in an unprecedented asylum program. Image by Emily Feldman/Illustration by Lyne Lucien/The Daily Beast. Iraq, 2015.

Mirza Dinnayi, a Yazidi activist and humanitarian, helped the German state of Baden-Württemberg transport more than 1,000 survivors of ISIS slavery to Germany for medical and psychological treatment in an unprecedented asylum program. Image by Emily Feldman/Illustration by Lyne Lucien/The Daily Beast. Iraq, 2015.

The Brave Activist Who Helped Save Over 1,000 ISIS Slaves

Emily Feldman

Who can forget the images of scores of Yazidi refugees fleeing ISIS’s “forced conversion” campaign in 2014—and the subsequent charges of genocide and slavery? In Emily Feldman’s moving new story for The Daily Beast, Mirza Dinnayi, a Yazidi activist living in Germany, used a loophole in German law that allows a single state to host its own refugee program and thus potentially save thousands of Yazidis.

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Mr. He Quangui sat on a stool while Mi Shixiu helped scrub him down. He once weighed 140 pounds, but is now barely 88 pounds. Image by Sim Chi Yin. China, 2015.

Mr. He Quangui sat on a stool while Mi Shixiu helped scrub him down. He once weighed 140 pounds, but is now barely 88 pounds. Image by Sim Chi Yin. China, 2015.

Black Lung in China

Sim Chi Yin

Pneumoconiosis, or “black lung,” is China’s most prevalent occupational disease, affecting at least 6 million people. Sim Chi Yin’s new interactivetells the story of one victim, a gold miner, as he fought to breathe.

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A scene from the Munsu Water Park in Pyongyang, North Korea. Image by Laya Maheshwari. North Korea, 2016.

A scene from the Munsu Water Park in Pyongyang, North Korea. Image by Laya Maheshwari. North Korea, 2016.

A North Korean Film Festival

Laya Maheshwari

What is entertainment like in a country where the government controls every aspect of its citizens’ lives? Laya Maheshwari journeys to North Korea to answer this question, attending a government-run film festival showcasing the “virtues of socialist life.”

Editor's Note: The text has been corrected. Mirza Dinnayi is actually not a doctor. He is a humanitarian activist who is nicknamed "Dr. Mirza."