"I ran away 27 times," said Marcel Ellery, who attended the Marieval Indian Residential School from 1987-1990. "But the (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) always found us eventually. When I got out, I turned to booze because of the abuse. I drank to suppress what had happened to me, to deal with my anger, to deal with my pain, to forget. Ending up in jail was easy, because I'd already been there." Image by Daniella Zalcman. Canada, 2015.
"I ran away 27 times," said Marcel Ellery, who attended the Marieval Indian Residential School from 1987-1990. "But the (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) always found us eventually. When I got out, I turned to booze because of the abuse. I drank to suppress what had happened to me, to deal with my anger, to deal with my pain, to forget. Ending up in jail was easy, because I'd already been there." Image by Daniella Zalcman. Canada, 2015. Add this image to a lesson

Photojournalist Daniella Zalcman has won the 2016 Inge Morath Award for her Pulitzer Center-supported project, "Signs of Your Identity," that explores the legacy of Canada’s Indian Residential Schools.

The $5,000 award is provided to a woman photographer under the age of 30 to support the completion of a long-term documentary project. The recipient is selected by the membership of Magnum Photos, Magnum Foundation, and the Inge Morath Foundation.

“Zalcman’s multiple exposure black-and-white portraits of native Canadian survivors of residential schools are layered with images that evoke the dislocation and cultural and physical violence of their shared past," said Magnum Foundation Executive Director Kristen Lubben. "We are pleased to be able to recognize Zalcman’s creative approach to addressing memory and trauma, and to support her in expanding this thoughtful and distinctive project. We join the membership of Magnum Photos and the Inge Morath Foundation in honoring Inge’s legacy through this award.”

In addition to the 2016 Inge Morath Award, Zalcman recently won the 2016 FotoEvidence Book Award for "Signs of Your Identity."

Project

For more than a century, many Western governments operated a network of Indian Residential Schools that were meant to assimilate young indigenous students into mainstream European culture. The results were devastating.

Recently

January 10, 2017 /
Daniella Zalcman
Photojournalist Daniella Zalcman leads free workshop for educators on ways to use photography, research and interview skills to explore her "Signs of Your Identity" project in the classroom.
Glen Ewenin who attended Gordon's Residential School from 1970-1973 and Muskowekwan Indian Residential School from 1973-1975. Image by Daniella Zalcman. Canada, 2016.
December 27, 2016 /
Daniella Zalcman
Listen to award-winning journalist Daniella Zalcman discuss her latest work on Canada's Indian residential schools titled: "Signs of Your Identity."