Media

Article

Navigating Cairo's Ferries

Egypt's Nile transport has some safety concerns, but if utilized properly it could mean a whole lot more lives (and money) are saved.

Welcome to Exeter Food Bank

The story of Nigel Brown (not his real name) reminds us of how easily, and how quickly, anyone can become reliant on a local Food Bank - and the related health implications this brings.

This Week in Review: Grabbing Gold

This Week
Grabbing Gold

From Eastern Europe to South America, soaring gold prices have triggered a global gold rush. Industrial mining companies—quite a few of them based in Canada—are muscling aside small local operations and laying waste to large swaths of previously pristine countryside. It is an under-reported crisis that has been on the Pulitzer Center’s radar for more than a year, and it now seems to be gaining some media traction.

This Week in Review: Libya's Sexual Revolution

This Week
Libya's Most Eligible Bachelors

After toppling a string of dictators across the region, the Arab Spring can also claim credit for launching a sexual revolution of sorts. Ellen Knickmeyer, writing for Foreign Policy, reports that young men in Libya, especially those who took up arms against the Qaddafi regime, suddenly find themselves looking more attractive to women.

This Week in Review: China's Stolen Children

This Week
A Bachelor Nation As Big As Texas

China’s draconian one-child policy helped check population growth in the world’s most populous country, but because of the ancient preference for sons, it has also thrown the country’s gender ratio completely out of whack. Today, for every 100 females in China, there are 120 males. In some areas the ratio is 100 to 150. This means that by 2020, China will have a nation of bachelors as large as the entire population of Texas.