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Artikel Publication logo Juni 20, 2022

Geliat Masyarakat Pulihkan Taman Nasional

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Penulis:
A man cuts down a tree.
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Communities work to regrow the forest by planting trees. Some efforts paid off, but challenges...

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This story excerpt was translated from bahasa Indonesia. To read the original story in full, visit Betahita.ID. You may also view the original story on the Rainforest Journalism Fund website here. Our website is available in English, Spanish, bahasa Indonesia, French, and Portuguese.



Rini (29) is the only woman working in the field with local communities in restoration efforts in Tanjung Putih National Park, Central Kalimantan. Planting trees, for her, is like raising a baby, which must be cared for continuously. Image by Betahita/Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.

Pesalat, an area in Central Kalimantan's Tanjung Puting National Park, is lush with aloes, meranti, jelutong, ulin, ramin, nyatuh and other endemic plants. The canopy is tight, leaving small 'windows' for sunlight to enter.

The return of this area to tropical rainforest conditions is inseparable from the hard work of the surrounding community since three decades ago. A photo taken in 2003 shows the condition of the pesalat area. There was only a wooden stilt house, a burnt black ironwood tree, and a field of weeds growing around it.

Since 2003, Friends of the National Parks Foundation (FNPF) has been granted a restoration license in the 400-hectare Pesalat area. Together with the local community, this location has become a 'learning house' to recognize seedlings and also find ways to make restoration economical, effective and easy.

"I started learning (restoration) from Pesalat with my friends, after illegal mining. I was 14 years old at the time," said Ariyadi (29), one of the youth of Sungai Sekonyer Village, West Kotawaringin Regency, Central Kalimantan.

Graph by Betahita. Indonesia, 2022.
Made with Flourish

Graph by Betahita. Indonesia, 2022.
Made with Flourish

Land in the Pondok Tanggui restoration area by the Tanjung Puting National Park Center that is still filled with bruta. Some of the restored trees are growing. This area has become one of the orangutan roaming areas and orangutan feeding tours. Image courtesy of Betahita-Mongabay Indonesia collaboration team. Indonesia, 2022.

People planting trees in the Jerumbun area, Kumai District, Central Kalimantan. Jerumbun is one of the buffer zones of Tanjung Puting National Park. Image courtesy of Betahita-Mongabay Indonesia collaboration team. Indonesia, 2022.

Sumatran elephants, tigers and rhinos are the key animals of Way Kambas National Park. Image courtesy of Betahita-Mongabay Indonesia collaboration team. Indonesia, 2022.

The entrance gate of the restoration camp managed by KTH Rahayu Jaya, which was initiated by the Labuhan Ratu VII Village community. This group is one of the conservation partners of Way Kambas National Park, Lampung. Image courtesy of Betahita-Mongabay Indonesia collaboration team. Indonesia, 2022.

The nursery area in Rawa Kidang restoration, Margahayu Resort, Way Kambas National Park is managed by the Forest Farmers Group (KTH) Rahayu Jaya. The plants planted are rhino food. Image courtesy of Betahita-Mongabay Indonesia collaboration team. Indonesia, 2022.

Hadi, head of the KTH Rahayu Jaya group with one of the group members in the Rawa Kidang restoration nursery area, Way Kambas National Park, Lampung. Image courtesy of Betahita-Mongabay Indonesia collaboration team. Indonesia, 2022.

Rusdiyanto, an extension agent from the Way Kambas National Park Office who assists forest farmer groups in villages around the national park, shows the restoration progress carried out by KTH Rahayu Jaya in Rawa Kidang. Image courtesy of Betahita-Mongabay Indonesia collaboration team. Indonesia, 2022.

Before 2012, the Bambangan area in SPTN III Kuala Penet, Way Kambas National Park, was barren and overgrown with weeds and shrubs. ALeRT began restoration at this location in June 2012. Despite a fire in 2014, the area recovered and has since become a forest. Aerial photo taken in May 2022. Image by Salih Alimudin / ALeRT Communication Team. Indonesia, 2022.

Camp Bambangan restoration area taken by drone. ALeRT is working with the community to safeguard the area. Image by Salih Alimudin / ALeRT Kominfo Team. Indonesia, 2022.

Forest and land fires in Way Kambas National Park are triggered by illegal hunting. Image courtesy of Dok Istimewa. Indonesia, 2022.

Puspa trees grow in the restoration area at Rawa Kadut managed by the Auriga Foundation. This plant is a key plant in Way Kambas National Park because it is fire-resistant. Image courtesy of Betahita-Mongabay Indonesia collaboration team. Indonesia, 2022.

Two ALeRT staff pointed out that last night an elephant passed by Bambangan camp, Way Kambas National Park. This restoration area is one of the successful restoration areas in Way Kambas National Park. Indicators of successful restoration are the sound and presence of animals that are often encountered. Image courtesy of Betahita-Mongabay Indonesia Collaboration Team. Indonesia, 2022.

KTH Mekar Sari community bee demonstration plot in the buffer zone of Way Kambas National Park. Groups from other villages, such as KTH Rahayu Jaya, become 'partners' to learn honey business development. Image courtesy of Betahita-Mongabay Indonesia collaboration team. Indonesia, 2022.

Members of KTH Mekar Sari, Rantau Jaya Udik II Village, Sukadana, harvest honey from beekeeping. This type of business is being developed in the buffer villages around Way Kambas National Park, Lampung. Image courtesy of Betahita-Mongabay Indonesia Collaboration Team. Indonesia, 2022.
Graph by Betahita. Indonesia, 2022.
Made with Flourish
Graph by Betahita. Indonesia, 2022.
Made with Flourish

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