March 9, 2015 / Untold Stories
Richard Vijgen, Bregtje van der Haak
The Atlas of Pentecostalism project is an expanding record of the fastest growing religion in the world.
March 6, 2015 /
Kwame Dawes, Andre Lambertson
Kwame Dawes explores what church and faith communities are doing in regards to HIV/AIDS in Jamaica.
March 5, 2015 / Untold Stories
Becca Thorpe
Recent debates over academic freedom are threatening Confucius Institutes’ relationships with their U.S. universities.
January 13, 2014
Tom Hundley
Each day, an estimated 35,000 people join a Pentecostal church. Of the world's two billion Christians, a quarter are now Pentecostals—up from just 6 percent in 1980.
January 13, 2014 / Untold Stories
Bregtje van der Haak, Richard Vijgen
Members of Nigeria's Redeemed Christian Church of God, the fastest-growing church in Africa, want to make it to heaven—and they want to take you with them.
January 13, 2014 / Untold Stories
Bregtje van der Haak
For those seeking help for infertility, the maternity clinic at Nigeria's biggest Pentecostal church offers a mix of modern medicine and divine intervention.
January 9, 2014 / Untold Stories
Richard Vijgen
The information designer who created the Atlas of Pentecostalism gives an audiovisual tour of the website's many innovative features.
January 9, 2014 / WBUR
Katherine Zoepf
Katherine Zoepf discusses her reporting on Saudi Arabian "Shopgirls" with Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti.
January 9, 2014 / Untold Stories
Bregtje van der Haak, Richard Vijgen
Pure, white and simple, the White Plastic Chair is the essential design item of global Pentecostalism.
January 9, 2014
Bregtje van der Haak
The journalist behind the Atlas of Pentecostalism explains the origins and techniques of a uniquely innovative reporting project.
January 9, 2014
Katherine Zoepf
Katherine Zoepf traveled to Saudi Arabia this fall to investigate how a new law that allows women to work in lingerie stores could be catalyst for a much bigger societal change.
January 6, 2014 / Untold Stories
Anup Kaphle
Pramila Dangol was among the hundreds of Nepalis who leave the country to work in the Persian Gulf every day—and among half a dozen dead bodies that return every week.
January 6, 2014 / The Washington Post
Anup Kaphle
The story of Pramila Dangol’s mysterious death is sadly not an uncommon one.

Pages