Tags

Investigative

Some news stories require greater investments of time to report, with journalists conducting exhaustive investigations using data, public and private records and interviews with a host of sources. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Investigative” feature in-depth reporting that delves deeply into serious issues. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on investigative journalism.

 

Murder in Malta

Daphne Caruana Galizia was Malta’s most dogged and controversial journalist. Last year she was murdered. Alexander Clapp travelled to the island to find out why.

Kruger’s Contested Borderlands

Displaced communities in Mozambique are calling out rich foreigners and corrupt politicians, saying their land is being unfairly taken in the name of environmental conservation.

Asset Forfeiture in Texas

In each of Texas' 254 counties, a host of local agencies can use civil asset forfeiture to help cover their expenses. But the system's lack of transparency and accountability makes it ripe for abuse.

Taken: How Police Profit From Seized Property

A data-driven look at the impact of civil asset forfeiture reform laws throughout the Midwest.

For-Profit Policing in Kentucky

Kentucky has some of the weakest laws in the country when it comes to protecting property from seizure. The Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting examines why law enforcement is seizing so much property—and who's suffering.

Children of the Incarcerated

What challenges do kids face when a parent is imprisoned? “Children of the Incarcerated" introduces young readers to programs that help families stay connected when a parent is behind bars.

Cross-border Conservation Land Grabs

Has a laudable transnational anti-poaching initiative been hijacked by organized crime? This project investigates claims the Kruger National Park poaching wars are used to create eco-cocoons for the mega-rich.

Venezuela’s New Gold Rush

For many people, gold fires the imagination, but can it resolve a crisis? Venezuela finds itself in distress and is going all-in on gold mining—an industry tainted by conflict.

The Hustlers' Embassy

The embassy was in a run down colonial building. President Obama's portrait was on the wall. The visas cost $6,000. Only one problem: none of it was real.

An American War in the Sahara

The U.S. military is building a major drone base in the Sahara Desert in Niger. Joe Penney looks at how an increasing American military presence will change the West African country.

Paradise Papers

ICIJ's global investigation that reveals the offshore activities of some of the world’s most powerful people and companies.

In Lazarat, the Fall of a Pot Empire

The residents of Lazarat, Albania, once grew $6 billion of marijuana per year under the nose of the state. What happens when that pot empire goes up in smoke?

The Federation Files

Together, more than 148 non-profit Jewish federations hold assets of $16 billion in the United States and Canada. Investigative journalist Uri Blau examines how the money is spent.

Meet the Journalist: Sean Lyngaas

Journalist Sean Lyngaas discusses the challenges of reporting on a sensitive and complex subject such as nuclear cybersecurity. He also highlights techniques for bringing the subject to life.

Meet the Journalist: Yepoka Yeebo

For over a decade, there existed a fake U.S. Embassy in Accra, Ghana. When the news broke, there were more questions than answers and some officials are convinced it didn't happen.

Meet the Journalist: Ben Mauk

In the 1950s the Cold War forever changed the American southwest, as thousands of hopeful uranium prospectors took to the hills in Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and beyond.

This Week: Family Divided at the Border

This week: reunification dreams stall due to continuing crisis along the border, Cape Town's water issues run deep, and Bhopal's 34-year-old environmental disaster still plagues residents.

This Week: Cracking the Indian Patriarchy

A poor school for girls in rural India reshapes the role of women, how Iraq's legal institutions are struggling to give closure to victims, and HIV's hold on Nigeria, Russia, and Florida.

This Week: Seeking Answers for Iran’s Chemical Weapons Survivors

This week: Scientists investigate the long term effects of chemical warfare on Iranian soldiers, a look into how artistic integrity is maintained inside the Chinese Communist system, and more than 100 people are suing Guam's Catholic Church over accusations of sexual abuse by priests.

Feature Writing Workshop

This resource outlines tips for feature writing that can be applied to a variety of events. Students in the DC metro area used these tips to reflect on workshops with Pulitzer Center journalists.