September 16, 2016 /
Joshua Kucera
Examining the cultural, historical, and political meanings of Europe by traveling along its geographical border with Asia.
Anti-coup protestors in Istanbul. Image courtesy of Maurice Flesier via Wikimedia Commons. Turkey, July, 2016.
September 11, 2016 / The New York Review of Books
Christopher de Bellaigue
July 15, when the supporters of President Erdogan foiled a coup attempt against him, may have been a turning point in Turkish history, opening the way to despotism but entrenching civilian rule.
The Ataturk memorial statue in Istanbul's Taksim Square on the night of the coup
September 4, 2016 /
Christopher de Bellaigue
The failed coup of July 15 brought Turks together to defeat an anti-democratic action by the military. But these events have left President Erdogan stronger—and more anti-Western—than ever.
Erdogan speaking as Prime Minister of Turkey. Photo courtesy of google images.
September 4, 2016 / The Guardian
Christopher de Bellaigue
It's commonly argued that President Erdogan's regime is a perversion of democratic norms. In fact, in the light of burgeoning populism around the world, his demokrasi is the new normal.
Supporters of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Istanbul’s Taksim Square, Image by Kursat Bayhan/Getty Images. Turkey, 2016.
August 6, 2016 / The New York Review of Books
Christopher de Bellaigue
Visiting Turkey in the aftermath of the failed coup of July 15, 2016, Christopher de Bellaigue found the country in a state of collective hyperventilation.
immigrants sleeping on tracks
July 26, 2016 / Herald (Pakistan)
Jodi Hilton
Beginning in April this year, Greece began deporting asylum seekers. Many of the deportees are Pakistani, in contradiction to the 1951 Refugee Convention.
May 17, 2016 / PRI's The World
Jeanne Carstensen, Jodi Hilton
An agreement between the European Union and Turkey, which took effect on March 20, severely limits the options of Syrian refugees.
February 9, 2016
Yigal Schleifer
Yigal Schleifer explores the European political sphere after the Cold War and examines the struggle for democratization in three countries: Hungary, Ukraine and Turkey.
February 8, 2016
Christopher de Bellaigue
Christopher de Bellaigue travels to Turkey to cover Selahattin Demirtas, the leader of the HDP, the main Kurdish party in Turkish politics, and explore his message of peace.
December 23, 2015
Evey Wilson
The Pulitzer Center staff share favorite images from 2015.
December 3, 2015 / The New York Review of Books
Christopher de Bellaigue
Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is a skillful political operator who guided his AK Party to victory in the recent elections. But at what cost to his country's fragile social fabric?
A graffiti-daubed house in the old walled city, in Diyarbakir, the main city in the Kurdish-majority southeast of Turkey. The graffiti says, 'you will see the strength of the Turk,' as well as exhortations to God, and was left by Turkish soldiers who recently fought running battles with Kurdish nationalists who had declared the walled city an autonomous zone. Image by Christopher de Bellaigue. Turkey, 2015.
November 4, 2015
Christopher de Bellaigue
Selahattin Demirtas guided his party to 59 seats in the Turkish general election of Nov. 1. He must now defend its peaceful message against the possibility of civil war.
October 29, 2015 / The Guardian
Christopher de Bellaigue
The charismatic Kurdish politician Selahattin Demirtaş holds the key to whether Turks and Kurds can live in peace.

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