March 28, 2014 / Untold Stories
Alyssa Howard
As Crimea officially joins Russia, international observers shift their attention to the future of Ukraine.
March 10, 2014 /
Tom Hundley
The crisis in Crimea has triggered a state of high dudgeon among the political classes here in Washington.
March 9, 2014 /
Marvin Kalb
Pulitzer Center senior adviser Marvin Kalb explains why Putin's actions in Crimea will ensure his political demise.
Image by Boryana Katsarova. Ukraine, 2014.
March 6, 2014
Dimiter Kenarov, Boryana Katsarova
Edging to the brink of civil war, Crimea has turned into a geopolitical crisis, perhaps the gravest threat to peace in Europe since the end of the Cold War.
February 27, 2014 / Untold Stories
Misha Friedman
A small group of LGBT activists tries to change the situation in one of Russia's most homophobic cities.
February 24, 2014 / Untold Stories
Misha Friedman
Dmitry Chizhevsky came to a Rainbow Coffee party in Saint Petersburg, an LGBT gathering. Little did he know that a few moments later he would lose his eye in an attack.
February 6, 2014 / Brookings Institution | Up Front
Marvin Kalb
As the Olympic Games begin in Sochi, Ukraine totters towards an economic and political collapse—a condition so potentially contagious to Russia that a concerned President Putin has begun a crackdown.
Image by Misha Friedman. Russia, 2013.
January 11, 2014
Misha Friedman
With homophobic rhetoric now legitimized by federal law, being gay in Russia can be extremely dangerous.
January 8, 2014 / BuzzFeed
Misha Friedman
Gays and lesbians living far from Russia's major population centers face daily discrimination and frequent violence.
December 27, 2013
Meghan Dhaliwal
The Pulitzer Center staff shares favorite images from 2013.
December 21, 2013 / Foreign Policy
Anna Nemtsova
This month Putin surprised even the biggest Russia experts: he pardoned his biggest enemy and critic Mikhail Khodorkovsky. There were some surprises for Putin too from crises regions.
December 19, 2013 / The Daily Beast
Anna Nemtsova
Even in the most remote provinces across Russia and its satellites, in post-industrial towns drowning in discontent, children study in arts schools, learn painting, music or ballet.
December 6, 2013 / Newsweek
Anna Nemtsova, Brendan Hoffman
Fear is the real legacy of Putin's Russia, particularly in Russia's 342 "monotowns," single industry centers where economies are collapsing and dissent is not tolerated.

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