Country

Mozambique

Crocodiles

I had been in the Gorongosa National Park for about a week when Carlos Lopes Pereira, director of conservation, told me that his rangers had found the crocodile.

"We are going to shoot it," he said. "It's near Vinho."

Go Gorongosa

Gorongosa National Park was once the crown jewel of Mozambique's national parks and one of the most fabled in Africa. But after 28 years of war, the park is now almost empty.

Greg Carr interviewed on PRI's The World

What can you do with 40 million dollars? Greg Carr believes he can rescue a corner of southern Africa. Carr is investing his own money in a project to restore a national park in Mozambique. The project is also meant to create an eco-tourism system to help sustain the park in the future. Anchor Lisa Mullins speaks to Carr about his plan.

Greg Carr — Gorongosa National Park (8:00)

Click here to listen to the interview.

Greg Carr's Big Gamble

In a watershed experiment, the Boston entrepreneur is putting $40 million of his own money into a splendid but ravaged park in Mozambique.

Gorongosa National Park: An introduction

In the center of Mozambique, a country of blinding white beaches and sweeping savannas, velvety green wetlands and spirit-filled forests, an American philanthropist is working to restore a long-forgotten national park; the first step, he hopes, in lifting this beleaguered region out of poverty.

Gorongosa National Park

Gorongosa National Park was once among the top destinations in Africa, with a greater animal concentration than on the Serengeti Plain. But during Mozambique's long civil war, soldiers and other poachers killed the animals, planted landmines and destroyed the infrastructure. For years, this beautiful landscape was all but abandoned.

Working with the Community

A main challenge of the Gorongosa project is convincing the people living around the park that cooperating will serve their interests. Poaching, deforestation and slash-and-burn agriculture still threaten the restoration efforts.

April 27, 2015

Surgery: The 'Neglected Stepchild' of Global Health

Bridget Huber

Surgically-treatable conditions cause more death and disability than HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, combined. Now, a group of doctors is pushing to put surgery on the global health agenda.

September 15, 2009

Heat of the Moment

Daniel Grossman

Planet Earth's average temperature has risen about one degree Fahrenheit in the last fifty years. By the end of this century it will be several degrees higher, according to the latest climate research. But global warming is doing more than simply making things a little warmer.

February 19, 2007

Mozambique: Paradise Lost, and Found?

Jeffrey Barbee, Stephanie Hanes, Stephen Sapienza

Before the Mozambican civil war, Gorongosa National Park was among the top destinations in Africa, with a higher concentration of animals than on the famed Serengeti Plain. But during the war, soldiers and other poachers killed these vast herds, planted landmines and destroyed the park's infrastructure. By the 1990s,...

Jon Sawyer and Loyce Kareri featured on BBC World News

After winning the Pulitzer Center's March 2008 Global Issues / Citizen Voices contest on Helium.com, Loyce Kareri appeared on BBC World news alongside Pulitzer Center Director Jon Sawyer to speak about the contest, her essay and what the future holds for citizen journalism.

Museum of Current Crises

This lesson plan outlines a project that allows students the opportunity to connect with a contemporary crisis somewhere in the world.