December 18, 2014 /
Gary Marcuse, Shi Lihong
Two Pulitzer Center-supported documentaries screen during festival, journalists on hand to discuss.
May 8, 2014 /
Jon Sawyer, kem knapp sawyer
Talks focus on Pulitzer Center's mission and its efforts at supporting journalists worldwide to explore systemic crises and engage diverse audiences.
The author Tan Hecheng stands on "Widow's Bridge," where dozens of people were clubbed to death and thrown into the river in a wave of genocide that took place in 1967. These sorts of hidden histories still haunt the new superpower. Image by Sim Chi Yin/ VII Photo Agency. China, 2016.
January 13, 2017 / The New York Review of Books
Ian Johnson
Put your butcher's sword down! Latest in my series of Q&As with leading Chinese thinkers about China's past, present and future. I traveled to rural China with Tan to look at the scene of a...
A sign in Ningxia, northwestern China, reads: "Love your country, love your religion; know the law, follow the law". Image by Alice Su. China, 2016.
January 6, 2017
Alice Su
China's Muslim minorities make up only two percent of the population, but comprise 20 million people. How do they relate to Islam, the state, the majority Han Chinese and one another?
Teacher Ou Shuiming's class photographed in 1983.
January 4, 2017
Rong Xiaoqing
Why are people who were smuggled to the U.S. from a rural high school in China three decades ago now going back to China?
January 4, 2017 / Foreign Policy
Rong Xiaoqing
Before she died in prison, 'Sister Ping' smuggled thousands from an obscure middle school to U.S. shores. Some now wish they'd never left.
Image of a A Uyghur woman standing at a religious shrine near Hotan, southern Xinjiang.
January 4, 2017 / The Caravan
Alice Su
For centuries, Uyghurs have journeyed between the different Muslim shrines dotting the Taklamakan Desert. Now, the Chinese state has forcibly closed many of them.
Tan Hecheng at a tombstone put up by Zhou Qun for her husband and three children, who were among the thousands of people killed during the Cultural Revolution in Dao County. Image by Sim Chi Yin. China/VII, 2016.
January 3, 2017 / The New York Review of Books
Ian Johnson
Ian Johnson goes to a remote Chinese province to write about an unknown case of genocide in the Cultural Revolution, a case that helps broaden the scope of Mao-era killings.
December 16, 2016 / Foreign Policy
Alice Su
Chinese authorities speak of terrorism as an ideological problem, but treat it as an ethnic one.
Richard Bernstein at the Collegiate School of Medicine and Bioscience
December 7, 2016
Richard Bernstein, Mark Schulte
Taiwanese sovereignty became news recently, and because of a recent education tour, St. Louis students were well-prepared to discuss the issue.
The writer Hu Fayun at his home in Wuhan, summer 2016. Image by Sim Chi Yin/VII Photos.
November 30, 2016 / The New York Review of Books
Ian Johnson, Sim Chi Yin
Talking China: the latest in a series of interviews with Chinese thinkers on how they push for change, the writer Hu Fayun reflects on how tough it is to remain an honest person inside the system.
Image by Alice Su. China, 2016.
October 25, 2016
Tom Hundley
This week, China's growing isolationism and its global influence, a North Korean film festival, and highlights from our student fellows Washington weekend.
October 17, 2016 / The Atlantic
Alice Su
Terror and religious extremism challenge a state unaccustomed to martyrdom narratives. Can a country doing business all over the world really avoid other peoples' politics?

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