Villagers rebuilding in Langtang, a popular tourist destination in northern Nepal where the 2015 earthquake triggered a monstrous avalanche and killed nearly 400 people, face uncertain future risks. Image by Jane Qiu. Nepal, 2016.
Villagers rebuilding in Langtang, a popular tourist destination in northern Nepal where the 2015 earthquake triggered a monstrous avalanche and killed nearly 400 people, face uncertain future risks. Image by Jane Qiu. Nepal, 2016. Add this image to a lesson

Pulitzer Center grantee journalist Jane Qiu received second place in the 2016 Asian Environmental Journalism Awards for her reporting of environmental issues in the Asian context.

Qiu received the honor in the category of the Environmental Journalist of the Year. The award-winning six-story package includes her article for Nature on heightened landslide risks after the magnitude-7.8 earthquake in Nepal in 2015. Such risks were largely under-appreciated in reconstruction plans at the time of her reporting.

Other stories in the package focus on grassland degradation in Tibet, the hunt for the oldest climate records in the Himalayas, and water shortage of the Indus River. In receiving the award, Qiu said that “it’s a recognition of pressing environmental issues in Tibet and the Himalayas and their impact on mountain communities, who are often marginalized and get the short end of the stick in terms of development and climate change.”

Project

The legacy of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal could last for decades. Scientists begin to understand why the badly shaken landscape is prone to landslides, especially during monsoons.

Recently

The shaken landscape in Nepal could have a heightened level of landslides years or even decades after the devastating earthquake in 2015. Image by Kristen Cook. Nepal, 2015.
November 17, 2016 /
Ari Daniel, Jane Qiu
Winning reporting focused on landslides in Nepal including work supported by the Pulitzer Center and published in Nature.
Eavesdropping on landslides
April 28, 2016 / Nature
Jane Qiu
Grantee Jane Qiu speaks to Nature’s Adam Levy about how the effects of last year's earthquake in Nepal could be felt for years or even decades.