Media

Video

Malawi: Food Aid Ethics

Fred de Sam Lazaro introduces his reports from Malawi and the ongoing debate over the benefits of providing cash or crops to recipient nations. He also looks into the growing effects of domestic farm law on world food markets.

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Sulu Gun Culture

Featured on Foreign Exchange the week of Friday, April 17, 2009

Produced by Orlando de Guzman in association with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

The Sulu archipelago in the southern Philippines has been the target of a U.S.- assisted counter-insurgency program since 2003, and American troops have helped rout the Abu Sayyaf rebel group. But it remains a dangerous place. Heavily armed rival clans have created an environment of ongoing violence largely unrelated to radical Islam - it's local politics through the barrel of a gun.

Nigeria: Families Left Hungry

The first in a series of reports from around the world about food, food policy, and food security: Nigeria, a country that has historically enjoyed food surpluses. That was before vast oil reserves were discovered. Today Africa's most populous nation must use its revenues to import food–elbowing out impoverished neighbors in a precarious regional food market.

Correspondent: Fred de Sam Lazaro
Producer: Nicole See
Videographer: Tom Adair
Editor: Skip Davis

Darfur: Broken Promises

More than a year ago, the United Nations mandated a peacekeeping force for the violence-torn Darfur region of Sudan. Two and a half million internally displaced people, known as "IDPs," remain in camps, under threat from government-sponsored forces. Undermanned and under resourced, the peacekeeping force is losing the trust of those it was meant to protect.

Produced, directed and shot by Susan Schulman

Co-produced and edited by Chris Milner

In association with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

Kashmir: Promise of Protest

Over the summer, tens of thousands of Kashmiri protesters jammed the streets demanding independence from India. It was the biggest public outcry since the revolt of 1989, when mass demonstrations were a prelude to years of militancy. The difference today is that a new generation of politically-minded youth is leading the way. While frustrations over the heavy-handed presence of Indian forces and economic inequalities still run deep, they are choosing non-violent means to push for change.