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Religion

Religion serves as the social bedrock of many communities around the globe, while also acting as a source of division and conflict. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Religion” feature reporting on faith, its effects on people’s lives, and the role it plays in civil society. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on religion.

 

Myanmar's Imagined Jihadis

Why the Burmese military has used the rhetoric of the global war on terror as a pretext for its ethnic cleansing campaign against the Rohingya Muslims

Migrant Life in Qatar

In Qatar and other Gulf countries, mostly low skilled migrant women pay the price for the crime of zina, which criminalizes unmarried sex and pregnancy out of wedlock.

Returning to Sosua

Emily Codik was surprised by the island's transformation from a safe haven for Holocaust refugees to a sex-tourism hotspot.

Maternal Health in Nicaragua and El Salvador

In Nicaragua and El Salvador, a complete abortion ban has led to unsafe abortions and turned doctors into informants. The number of girls under 14 who give birth has increased by 48 percent.

Nigeria: U.S. Dollars and Dubious Results

U.S. development projects target northern Nigeria where poverty, illiteracy and radical Islam shape economic and social realities, but the sustainability of these interventions is rarely discussed.

Jerusalem: Eternal City, Eternal Divide

Jerusalem, the meeting point of three major religions, is always set aside as the final item to be resolved in any discussion of Israeli-Palestinian peace. Have we waited too long?

Mali: War on Terror's Next Battleground

In northern Mali, far from Western eyes, a powerful Al Qaeda affiliate has managed to carve out what is effectively a new country. What they do with it will determine the future of the war on terror.

The Vatican and the Nuns

Cardinals in Rome ordered two investigations of American nuns. Is this a modern-day Inquisition? Jason Berry explores the forces behind this inner struggle of the church on both sides of the Atlantic.

Chaupadi: Nepali Women's Monthly Exile

In rural western Nepal, many women are sent to live in animal sheds while they are menstruating. This ingrained cultural practice, called chaupadi, can wreak unintended havoc on their health.

Armenians: War, Exile and the Loss of Syria

As Syrian Armenians flee their country’s violence to begin new lives in Armenia – a homeland they have never known – the high stakes of the unraveling of Syria come into clearer focus.

Egypt: The Country Outside the Square

After decades of trampled hopes under President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians are now working to figure out not only what they stand against, but what they stand for.

Afghanistan: On Love and Suicide

Anonymous and spoken, landai , two-line Pashtun poems, have served for centuries as a means of self-expression for women. Today they are an important vehicle of public dissent.

This Week: Terror at the Edge of the Sahara

In February, Pulitzer Center grantee Josh Hammer boarded a UN flight to Kidal, becoming the first journalist to visit the bleak outpost in the Malian desert since last November.

This Week: A Certain Medical Procedure

Abortion was outlawed in Indonesia nearly a century ago, but as Pulitzer Center senior editor Tom Hundley discovers, it is quite easy to obtain one.

This Week: Unwanted and Unprotected

Widowhood is not merely a tragic personal sorrow, it is a devastating state of diminishment that can trigger economic ruin and cruel social consequences that are felt for generations.

This Week: The Atlas of Pentecostalism

Each day, an estimated 35,000 people join a Pentecostal church. Of the world's two billion Christians, a quarter are now Pentecostals—up from just 6 percent in 1980.

This Week: From Malawi to Scotland

“She went back to her village and decided to live as if nothing had happened. Four years later, she was married. She said her husband didn't know anything about her past."

This Week: A New Libya

Does anyone miss Qaddafi? Not really. But as Nicolas Pelham reports, the Libyan Revolution of 2011 has not delivered on the reforms that so many had anticipated. And the worst may be yet to come.

This Week: Africa's War on Terror

Earlier this year, Yochi Dreazen traveled to northern Mali, where government troops and French special forces were battling a growing network of jihadists for control of a vast desert territory.

This Week: A Moveable Piece

The latest round of US-brokered Israeli-Palestinian peace talks has produced hints of a breakthrough on the most contentious of all issues—the final status of Jerusalem.