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Public Health

Public health focuses on the systematic prevention of disease and prolonging of life by governments, NGO’s and other groups. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Public Health” feature reporting on communicable and non-communicable diseases, the development of medical systems and infrastructure to provide public access to health care services. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on public health.

 

Making NewsHour Weekend: A Year of Reporting on the “Future of Food”

This year, the NewsHour Weekend special series “Future of Food” covered global efforts to produce and consume food sustainably and ethically. The producers behind the series, Megan Thompson and Melanie Saltzman, joined Hari Sreenivasan to discuss their reporting and how it impacted their own views on food.

China Has Pain Pill Addicts Too, but No One’s Counting Them

Painkiller addicts in China remain largely invisible and, despite strict regulations, can turn to online black markets for opioids and other prescription drugs. The Associated Press found previously unreported trafficking of OxyContin and Tylox on e-commerce and social media platforms run by China’s largest technology companies.

After the Quake: HIV/AIDS in Haiti

Last January's earthquake destroyed Haiti's health care system, once at the forefront of the struggle to treat and stop the spread of HIV/AIDS. A look at life since the quake, for those affected by HIV/AIDS.

The Price of White Eggs

The price of a human egg depends on the characteristics of the donor. Eggs harvested from white college students can sell for as much as $100,000. But there’s a cheaper way to get them.

Moldova: Fighting a Deadly Disease

Moldova has been hit particularly hard by the emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), a new, deadly strain of an age old disease.

Nigeria - The Edge of Joy

As Nigeria works to “re-brand” itself from a post-colonial military state to a progressive African democracy, political, civic and professional leaders have recognized the most intractable problem for this emerging society is also its most treatable: maternal and infant mortality.

India Casts a Light on Mothers Long in the Dark

In India the incidence of women dying while giving birth is among the highest in the world. How poverty, early marriage and poor infrastructure make childbirth fraught with risk.

The Struggle for Health in Chiapas

An infant born in the state of Chiapas as three times as likely to die as the rate for Mexico as a whole. The maternal mortality rate in neighboring Oaxaca is twice the national average. This project explains why, and what is being done in response.

East Africa: Access to Water

In much of the developing world, women spend more time fetching water than any other activity in their day. For more than a billion people, the water they do get is unsafe.

Dominican Republic: Life on the Margins

Some of the most marginalized people in the Caribbean are Haitian immigrants, and their descendents, living in the Dominican Republic.

Glass Closet: Sex, Stigma and HIV/AIDS in Jamaica

Jamaica has the reputation of being one of the most violently anti-gay countries on earth. Male homosexual acts are criminalized – and can be punished with up to 10 years of hard time in prison.

Mothers of Ethiopia

In the U.S., a woman has a 1 in 4,800 chance of dying from complications due to pregnancy or childbirth in her lifetime. In Ethiopia, a woman has a 1 in 27 chance of dying. Hanna shares her experiences and observations in a five-part series on Mothers Of Ethiopia.

Honduras: Fighting Malnutrition

Nestled in a remote northern Honduras valley, Santa Lucia and the surrounding area are home to 20,000 rural inhabitants. These families rely solely on their agrarian skills for a subsistent living. According to UNICEF, over one-third of Honduran infants are malnourished due to this indigenous lifestyle. Four percent of Honduran children die before reaching five years of age, at a rate five times higher than that of U.S.

Guinea-Bissau: Dying for Treatment

Sub-Saharan Africa, the poorest region on Earth, is a place where more than 600,000 women die in pregnancy or childbirth every year due to lack of proper care and only 30 percent of the population has access to health care at all. The situation in Guinea-Bissau is among the...

This Week: Midas in Burkina Faso

Over the last two decades, Burkina Faso has emerged as Africa’s fourth largest exporter of gold, creating an ever-expanding army of child laborers.

This Week: Identity In Flames

The best journalism takes time — time to report, time to write. We urge you to take time to read two examples of long-form magazine journalism of the highest order.

This Week: A Stillborn Democracy

This week, millions of demonstrators poured into streets of cities and towns across Egypt to protest the many shortcomings of the country’s first democratically elected government.

This Week: Mine Control

Chinese dollars and the Chinese themselves have been pouring into Africa, mining the continent’s abundant resources, opening businesses, building infrastructure and generally making everyone nervous.

This Week in Review: Escape From Timbuktu

Tom Hundley shares this weeks reporting on the rare manuscripts smuggled from inside Timbuktu's hallowed libraries, child laborers in Burkina Faso and a conflict free tin mining initiative in the DRC.

This Week in Review: The Child Catchers

Senior Editor Tom Hundley shares this weeks reporting on the Ethiopian and American parents misled by adoption agencies and the Iowa medics providing healthcare in rural Haiti.