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Public Health

Public health focuses on the systematic prevention of disease and prolonging of life by governments, NGO’s and other groups. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Public Health” feature reporting on communicable and non-communicable diseases, the development of medical systems and infrastructure to provide public access to health care services. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on public health.

 

The House Where Our Stories Live

Pulitzer Center grantee Sarah Shourd reflects on how storytelling in different mediums can affect scale, audience, and impact.

How to Make Abortion Great Again

Poland has one of the most restrictive abortion laws in the European Union, and in practice, it's all but banned. But four women, nicknamed the "abortion dream team," are pushing back.

Brazil: Girl Power

In Brazil, increased access to education, information and contraception have combined to lower the birth rate by two thirds over the last five decades.

North Korea's Addicting Export: Crystal Meth

Cheap, available, and an antidote to hunger, crystal meth appears to be becoming the drug of choice both in North Korea, and in its porous border region with China.

Drug Companies Skirt FDA By Going Abroad

Big drug companies are increasingly going overseas to test new drugs and devices on patients. It’s a good deal for the companies, but what about consumers?

Belize: Improving the Odds for the Nation's Mothers

One woman dies every 90 seconds from pregnancy-related complications somewhere in the world. The Belize Ministry of Health is improving access, coverage, and quality of maternal health care in hopes of someday no longer being one of those places.

Guatemala: The Culture that Crawls

More than 20 million people worldwide are effectively immobile. One Mid-Missouri group is working to change that unfortunate reality in Guatemala, but the work they do won’t conquer the culture that crawls.

Niger: Feeding the Forgotten

A Niger drought means there is not enough food to feed the country; United Nations reports estimate 7.9 million inhabitants are facing food shortages there.

After the Quake: HIV/AIDS in Haiti

Last January's earthquake destroyed Haiti's health care system, once at the forefront of the struggle to treat and stop the spread of HIV/AIDS. A look at life since the quake, for those affected by HIV/AIDS.

The Price of White Eggs

The price of a human egg depends on the characteristics of the donor. Eggs harvested from white college students can sell for as much as $100,000. But there’s a cheaper way to get them.

Review of Alan Weisman's 'Countdown'

Alan Weisman, the author of bestseller "The World Without Us," says population is going in the wrong direction to achieve ecological sustainability. In his new book, he looks at the world with us

This Week: Poisoning the Pacific

We know that carbon dioxide emissions are affecting the planet’s climate. Now it appears that these carbon emissions are also altering the chemistry of our oceans.

This Week: The Lingering Disaster

Last April, the world was shocked and outraged by the Rana Plaza disaster—a building collapse that claimed the lives of more than 1,200 garment workers in a Dhaka sweatshop. Has anything changed?

This Week: When the Fish are Gone

Global warming, pollution and overfishing are killing the world’s oceans. Pulitzer Center grantees Erik Vance and Dominic Bracco II take us to the Sea of Cortez.

This Week: KISS in Class

Small class-sizes are great — if you happen to live in a wealthy country like the United States. In India, it's a different story.

This Week: Midas in Burkina Faso

Over the last two decades, Burkina Faso has emerged as Africa’s fourth largest exporter of gold, creating an ever-expanding army of child laborers.

This Week: Identity In Flames

The best journalism takes time — time to report, time to write. We urge you to take time to read two examples of long-form magazine journalism of the highest order.