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Public Health

Public health focuses on the systematic prevention of disease and prolonging of life by governments, NGO’s and other groups. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Public Health” feature reporting on communicable and non-communicable diseases, the development of medical systems and infrastructure to provide public access to health care services. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on public health.

 

How to Defeat a Nerve Agent

The threat of future nerve agent attacks is spurring urgent efforts to find better countermeasures, with several promising compounds in the pipeline.

The Drug Decimating Russia’s Women

Designer drugs called ‘bath salts’ in the U.S. are dangerous to Americans, but addiction is epidemic among Russians, especially women. Many shoot up, and many contract HIV/AIDS.

Finding Therapy in Jordan

With only 60 to 100 psychiatrists in Jordan, there's little help for Syrian refugees. Local organizations and refugees are leading the work to ensure that refugees get the therapy that they need.

Outrage and Inspire

Roger Thurow shares stories of hunger across the world in a new podcast produced in collaboration with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

Guatemala: The Culture that Crawls

More than 20 million people worldwide are effectively immobile. One Mid-Missouri group is working to change that unfortunate reality in Guatemala, but the work they do won’t conquer the culture that crawls.

Niger: Feeding the Forgotten

A Niger drought means there is not enough food to feed the country; United Nations reports estimate 7.9 million inhabitants are facing food shortages there.

After the Quake: HIV/AIDS in Haiti

Last January's earthquake destroyed Haiti's health care system, once at the forefront of the struggle to treat and stop the spread of HIV/AIDS. A look at life since the quake, for those affected by HIV/AIDS.

The Price of White Eggs

The price of a human egg depends on the characteristics of the donor. Eggs harvested from white college students can sell for as much as $100,000. But there’s a cheaper way to get them.

Moldova: Fighting a Deadly Disease

Moldova has been hit particularly hard by the emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), a new, deadly strain of an age old disease.

Nigeria - The Edge of Joy

As Nigeria works to “re-brand” itself from a post-colonial military state to a progressive African democracy, political, civic and professional leaders have recognized the most intractable problem for this emerging society is also its most treatable: maternal and infant mortality.

India Casts a Light on Mothers Long in the Dark

In India the incidence of women dying while giving birth is among the highest in the world. How poverty, early marriage and poor infrastructure make childbirth fraught with risk.

The Struggle for Health in Chiapas

An infant born in the state of Chiapas as three times as likely to die as the rate for Mexico as a whole. The maternal mortality rate in neighboring Oaxaca is twice the national average. This project explains why, and what is being done in response.

East Africa: Access to Water

In much of the developing world, women spend more time fetching water than any other activity in their day. For more than a billion people, the water they do get is unsafe.

Dominican Republic: Life on the Margins

Some of the most marginalized people in the Caribbean are Haitian immigrants, and their descendents, living in the Dominican Republic.

Review of Alan Weisman's 'Countdown'

Alan Weisman, the author of bestseller "The World Without Us," says population is going in the wrong direction to achieve ecological sustainability. In his new book, he looks at the world with us

This Week: Poisoning the Pacific

We know that carbon dioxide emissions are affecting the planet’s climate. Now it appears that these carbon emissions are also altering the chemistry of our oceans.

This Week: The Lingering Disaster

Last April, the world was shocked and outraged by the Rana Plaza disaster—a building collapse that claimed the lives of more than 1,200 garment workers in a Dhaka sweatshop. Has anything changed?

This Week: When the Fish are Gone

Global warming, pollution and overfishing are killing the world’s oceans. Pulitzer Center grantees Erik Vance and Dominic Bracco II take us to the Sea of Cortez.

This Week: KISS in Class

Small class-sizes are great — if you happen to live in a wealthy country like the United States. In India, it's a different story.

This Week: Midas in Burkina Faso

Over the last two decades, Burkina Faso has emerged as Africa’s fourth largest exporter of gold, creating an ever-expanding army of child laborers.

This Week: Identity In Flames

The best journalism takes time — time to report, time to write. We urge you to take time to read two examples of long-form magazine journalism of the highest order.