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Public Health

Public health focuses on the systematic prevention of disease and prolonging of life by governments, NGO’s and other groups. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Public Health” feature reporting on communicable and non-communicable diseases, the development of medical systems and infrastructure to provide public access to health care services. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on public health.

 

Malawi: Toxic Cooking Smoke Silently Kills

In Malawi, women smoke themselves to death—yet only 0.4 percent of women in the country puff cigarettes. Cooking smoke poses a serious public health threat to the country’s female population.

Malawi's Toxic Kitchens

The smoke of cooking fires makes Malawi’s women and children sick, but not everyone can afford an improved cook stove.

Looking For Happier Endings

On the ground with Dinna Louise C. Dayao in the Philippines, a country where, every hour, someone somewhere dies in a road crash.

Pollution in China

Air pollution in Beijing is one result of the breakneck economic growth that has lifted hundreds of millions of China’s people out of poverty.

Nigeria: Oil Rich But Hungry

Twenty-five years ago Abdullahi Tijjani had a vision for Kuki, a village in the north of Nigeria he became chief of at age 14: "Hunger will become a thing of the past once we marry modern technologies and traditional farming," he told reporter David Hecht when they met in...

Hope: Living and Loving with HIV in Jamaica

Poet and writer Kwame Dawes travels to Jamaica to explore the experience of people living with HIV/AIDS and to examine the ways in which the disease has shaped their lives. The journey brings him in touch with people who tell their stories, share their lives and teach him about resilience,...

Heroes of HIV: HIV in the Caribbean

With HIV rates second only to those of sub-Saharan Africa, Caribbean islands that conjure visions of sun and sand now highlight the interplay between poverty and the epidemic in this hemisphere.

American Imports, Chinese Deaths

Reporter Loretta Tofani gets inside America's factory, China, where the lack of health and safety precautions has Chinese workers dying.

In interviews with dozens of dying workers and through review of their medical records, she documents how Chinese workers routinely lose limbs from old machinery or develop fatal diseases...

Hope for Lwala

Seven years ago, Milton Ochieng' became the first person from his village in Kenya to receive a college scholarship in the United States. There was only one problem: His family could not afford the airfare. So neighbors in Lwala sold their cows, took out personal loans and raised nine hundred...

Vietnam: War's Lasting Legacy

More than three decades after the Vietnam War ended, the Vietnamese people continue to live with the consequences of Agent Orange, a defoliant that has come to symbolize the unintended consequences of warfare.

During the war, American forces sprayed nearly two million gallons of Agent Orange across...

Rwanda: Teens Reaching Across a Divide

Several Vermont high school students traveled to Rwanda in December 2006 to meet with teenagers orphaned by AIDS. The six students and adults from two schools filmed, photographed and interviewed Rwandan teenagers participating in a program aimed at helping them become financially independent.

The program, based in the Rwandan...

This Week in Review: The Child Catchers

Senior Editor Tom Hundley shares this weeks reporting on the Ethiopian and American parents misled by adoption agencies and the Iowa medics providing healthcare in rural Haiti.

This Week in Review: Untouchable

Today is International Women’s Day and the plight of women and children in crisis is a recurring theme in much of the reporting that the Pulitzer Center supports.

This Week in Review: What We Eat

Long a staple in the developing world, palm oil’s versatility and long shelf-life are fueling a surging demand that has turned it into a lucrative cash crop--with devastating consequences.