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Public Health

Public health focuses on the systematic prevention of disease and prolonging of life by governments, NGO’s and other groups. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Public Health” feature reporting on communicable and non-communicable diseases, the development of medical systems and infrastructure to provide public access to health care services. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on public health.

 

How Cape Town Defeated Day Zero—for Now

Reporting from Cape Town, South Africa, Jacqueline Flynn explores the reality of living with Level 6 water restrictions and the little changes that made the biggest difference for Capetonians during the water crisis.

Cape Town Water Crisis: A Timeline

What were the first signs of a looming water crisis in Cape Town? What restrictions were placed on residents? And how did Capetonians reduce their water consumption?

The Weight of Numbers: Air Pollution and PM2.5

Larry C. Price visited seven countries to examine the impacts of PM2.5 air pollution, and to uncover what’s being done—or not—to address this ambient and ultimately controllable killer.

Gasping for Air in India’s Industrial North

Air pollution kills one million Indians annually. In the northern city of Patna, the problem shaves four years, on average, off residents’ lives.

Transforming journalism: HOPE & Glass Closet

Award-winning multimedia reporting projects on HIV/AIDS that combine print reporting, poetry, photography, video, radio, music and an open dialogue to engage the broadest possible audience.

Tuesday, September 22
12:00-2:00 pm: Panel discussion and screening
Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism
Third Floor Lecture Hall

Panelists:
Pulitzer Center Executive Director Jon Sawyer
HOPE Special Correspondent/Poet: Kwame Dawes
Glass Closet Filmmaker: Micah Fink
WorldFocus Producer: Lisa Biagiotti

LiveHopeLove.com Wins an Emmy!

Pulitzer Center's multimedia website on the human face of HIV/AIDS in Jamaica has won an Emmy for new approaches to news and documentary programming, in the arts, lifestyle and culture category, announced Sept 21, at the 30th annual News & Documentary Emmy Awards at the Lincoln Center's Rose Theater in New York City.

Loretta Tofani Awarded "Special Citation" as Daniel Pearl Award Finalist

Loretta Tofani was awarded $2,000 by a five judge panel at the Daniel Pearl Award for Outstanding International Investigative Reporting for her "American Imports, Chinese Deaths" reporting project. Formerly called the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) Award, the honor was renamed this year after Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter murdered in 2002 by Pakistani militants. Two teams of journalists were awarded $10,000 each and the title of the 2008 Daniel Pearl Award.

Yes Weekly: Dawes and Simmonds’ genius elevates Hope Wisteria to unimaginable heights

Near the finale of Wisteria, a multimedia performance based on Kwame Dawes' poems about the memories and experiences of African-American women growing up in the segregated South, Dawes stepped away from the microphone inside Hanes Auditorium on the campus of Salem College. He then gazed upon the five singers, musical collaborator Kevin Simmonds and the seven-member ensemble that helped bring his poems to life with a look that could best be described as a mixture of reverence and pride.

Wisteria & HOPE review in the Winston-Salem Journal

Grand: The piece makes a wonderful whole

Pulitzer Center

Tim Clodfelter, The Winston-Salem Journal

Poet Kwame Dawes provided the words for HOPE & Wisteria, two back-to-back performance pieces that explore different aspects of the black experience. But his contribution, vital as it is, is only one part of the puzzle. Each production is a multimedia piece using music, images and Dawes' poetry.

"A feast for the eyes and ears," Wisteria & HOPE in the News and Observer

WINSTON-SALEM -- Poetry, music and photography combine to explore HIV/AIDS in Jamaica and the experiences of Southern black women in "Wisteria & HOPE," a dual production tonight at the National Black Theatre Festival.

The evening opens with "Wisteria," based on a series of poems that Kwame Dawes, the University of South Carolina distinguished poet, wrote in 1995 to document the lives of African-American women.

HOPE: Excerpts from the National Black Theatre Festival

HOPE is a multimedia performance based on poems by Kwame Dawes, poet in residence at the University of South Carolina and set to music by composer Kevin Simmonds. The work grew out of a Pulitzer Center commission to report on the impact of HIV/AIDS on Jamaica, the country where Kwame Dawes grew up. While in Jamaica Dawes wrote poems in response to the stories he heard.

Wisteria & HOPE on the cover of Winston-Salem Journal's Relish section

Published: July 30, 2009

Images, music and the words of poet Kwame Dawes will be featured in two multimedia productions being shown together as part of this year's National Black Theatre Festival.

Wisteria is about a group of women who grew up in the American South in the years before the civil rights movement. HOPE: Living & Loving With HIV in Jamaica follows people coping with HIV/AIDS in modern day.

Kwame Dawes launches Hope's Hospice

Join Kwame Dawes on July 12 to celebrate the launch of his new book of poetry, Hope's Hospice, inspired by the people he met while reporting on HIV/AIDS in Jamaica for the Pulitzer Center. The event will be held at 11 am at the University of the West Indies in Mona, Jamaica.

Kwame Dawes' work will also be showcased at the National Black Theatre Festival in Winston-Salem, NC on August 6 and 7. Learn more about this event and how to attend.