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Public Health

Public health focuses on the systematic prevention of disease and prolonging of life by governments, NGO’s and other groups. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Public Health” feature reporting on communicable and non-communicable diseases, the development of medical systems and infrastructure to provide public access to health care services. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on public health.

 

The First Undeniable Climate Change Deaths

In 2018 in Japan, more than 1,000 people died during an unprecedented heat wave. In 2019, scientists proved it would have been impossible without global warming.

More QC Museums Reopening

The eight-year-old Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum, in a historic Rock Island, Illinois, building, reopened June 26, but doesn’t draw many visitors, according to co-director Margie Cain, who runs the facility with her husband Chris.

QC Museums Reopening

Though Illinois allowed indoor museums to re-open June 26, while the Covid-19 pandemic still raged across the nation, museums and historic homes in the Quad-Cities have taken different approaches to re-opening.

'It Was an Inconvenience, but It Was Also Devastating,' Greensboro Mom Says. Pandemic Worsens NC's Child Care Shortage.

Despite millions of dollars in public relief to child care centers, more than 1,500 North Carolina programs — one in four — remain closed, according to data from the state Department of Health and Human Services. Others now operate at reduced capacity. This shortage arrives at a moment when many parents — eager to return to work as their unemployment benefits run out — desperately search for placements.

Guinea-Bissau: Dying for Treatment

Sub-Saharan Africa, the poorest region on Earth, is a place where more than 600,000 women die in pregnancy or childbirth every year due to lack of proper care and only 30 percent of the population has access to health care at all. The situation in Guinea-Bissau is among the...

Guatemala: Forgotten Trauma

Samuel Loewenberg ventures to Guatemala to survey the underlying issues of the Central American country's extreme poverty. There, income inequality equals the worst in Africa - particularly among indigenous communities. In some regions, an estimated 75 percent of the children from infants to the ages of 6 and 7...

Inside Gaza

Gazan healthcare facilities have been strangled by an Israeli blockade since June 2007, when Hamas wrested control of Gaza from rival Fatah. Since Israel began its massive offensive against Hamas on December 27, 2008, conditions in Gaza's hospitals have faced extreme difficulty in their efforts to care for thousands...

Cuba: Tropical Depression

Six months after Fidel Castro's exit, Lygia Navarro explores the hidden epidemic of depression in Cuba. With the wait for social and economic transformation dragging on, many Cubans find escape from the difficulty of day-to-day life in black-market sleeping pills. Although Cuba's medical system is lauded internationally, the government...

Nigeria: Oil Rich But Hungry

Twenty-five years ago Abdullahi Tijjani had a vision for Kuki, a village in the north of Nigeria he became chief of at age 14: "Hunger will become a thing of the past once we marry modern technologies and traditional farming," he told reporter David Hecht when they met in...

Hope: Living and Loving with HIV in Jamaica

Poet and writer Kwame Dawes travels to Jamaica to explore the experience of people living with HIV/AIDS and to examine the ways in which the disease has shaped their lives. The journey brings him in touch with people who tell their stories, share their lives and teach him about resilience,...

Heroes of HIV: HIV in the Caribbean

With HIV rates second only to those of sub-Saharan Africa, Caribbean islands that conjure visions of sun and sand now highlight the interplay between poverty and the epidemic in this hemisphere.

American Imports, Chinese Deaths

Reporter Loretta Tofani gets inside America's factory, China, where the lack of health and safety precautions has Chinese workers dying.

In interviews with dozens of dying workers and through review of their medical records, she documents how Chinese workers routinely lose limbs from old machinery or develop fatal diseases...

Hope for Lwala

Seven years ago, Milton Ochieng' became the first person from his village in Kenya to receive a college scholarship in the United States. There was only one problem: His family could not afford the airfare. So neighbors in Lwala sold their cows, took out personal loans and raised nine hundred...

Vietnam: War's Lasting Legacy

More than three decades after the Vietnam War ended, the Vietnamese people continue to live with the consequences of Agent Orange, a defoliant that has come to symbolize the unintended consequences of warfare.

During the war, American forces sprayed nearly two million gallons of Agent Orange across...

Rwanda: Teens Reaching Across a Divide

Several Vermont high school students traveled to Rwanda in December 2006 to meet with teenagers orphaned by AIDS. The six students and adults from two schools filmed, photographed and interviewed Rwandan teenagers participating in a program aimed at helping them become financially independent.

The program, based in the Rwandan...

This Week in Review: The Child Catchers

Senior Editor Tom Hundley shares this weeks reporting on the Ethiopian and American parents misled by adoption agencies and the Iowa medics providing healthcare in rural Haiti.

This Week in Review: Untouchable

Today is International Women’s Day and the plight of women and children in crisis is a recurring theme in much of the reporting that the Pulitzer Center supports.

This Week in Review: What We Eat

Long a staple in the developing world, palm oil’s versatility and long shelf-life are fueling a surging demand that has turned it into a lucrative cash crop--with devastating consequences.