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Public Health

Public health focuses on the systematic prevention of disease and prolonging of life by governments, NGO’s and other groups. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Public Health” feature reporting on communicable and non-communicable diseases, the development of medical systems and infrastructure to provide public access to health care services. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on public health.

 

Signs of Execution

On the night of June 21, 2017, seven people died from drug-related deaths, adding to the more than 12,000 dead since President Duterte began his war on drugs in the Philippines.

Killers Haunt a Wake

A mother recounts the night her son was murdered and how the killers scared mourners from his wake.

Type 1 Diabetes in Rural Costa Rica

If a family is unable to pay for a child with Type 1 diabetes, only the most economical supplies are provided by the Costa Rican Government. This allows little to no flexibility in one's life.

Honduras: Fighting Malnutrition

Nestled in a remote northern Honduras valley, Santa Lucia and the surrounding area are home to 20,000 rural inhabitants. These families rely solely on their agrarian skills for a subsistent living. According to UNICEF, over one-third of Honduran infants are malnourished due to this indigenous lifestyle. Four percent of Honduran children die before reaching five years of age, at a rate five times higher than that of U.S.

Guinea-Bissau: Dying for Treatment

Sub-Saharan Africa, the poorest region on Earth, is a place where more than 600,000 women die in pregnancy or childbirth every year due to lack of proper care and only 30 percent of the population has access to health care at all. The situation in Guinea-Bissau is among the...

Guatemala: Forgotten Trauma

Samuel Loewenberg ventures to Guatemala to survey the underlying issues of the Central American country's extreme poverty. There, income inequality equals the worst in Africa - particularly among indigenous communities. In some regions, an estimated 75 percent of the children from infants to the ages of 6 and 7...

Inside Gaza

Gazan healthcare facilities have been strangled by an Israeli blockade since June 2007, when Hamas wrested control of Gaza from rival Fatah. Since Israel began its massive offensive against Hamas on December 27, 2008, conditions in Gaza's hospitals have faced extreme difficulty in their efforts to care for thousands...

Cuba: Tropical Depression

Six months after Fidel Castro's exit, Lygia Navarro explores the hidden epidemic of depression in Cuba. With the wait for social and economic transformation dragging on, many Cubans find escape from the difficulty of day-to-day life in black-market sleeping pills. Although Cuba's medical system is lauded internationally, the government...

Nigeria: Oil Rich But Hungry

Twenty-five years ago Abdullahi Tijjani had a vision for Kuki, a village in the north of Nigeria he became chief of at age 14: "Hunger will become a thing of the past once we marry modern technologies and traditional farming," he told reporter David Hecht when they met in...

Hope: Living and Loving with HIV in Jamaica

Poet and writer Kwame Dawes travels to Jamaica to explore the experience of people living with HIV/AIDS and to examine the ways in which the disease has shaped their lives. The journey brings him in touch with people who tell their stories, share their lives and teach him about resilience,...

Heroes of HIV: HIV in the Caribbean

With HIV rates second only to those of sub-Saharan Africa, Caribbean islands that conjure visions of sun and sand now highlight the interplay between poverty and the epidemic in this hemisphere.

American Imports, Chinese Deaths

Reporter Loretta Tofani gets inside America's factory, China, where the lack of health and safety precautions has Chinese workers dying.

In interviews with dozens of dying workers and through review of their medical records, she documents how Chinese workers routinely lose limbs from old machinery or develop fatal diseases...

Hope for Lwala

Seven years ago, Milton Ochieng' became the first person from his village in Kenya to receive a college scholarship in the United States. There was only one problem: His family could not afford the airfare. So neighbors in Lwala sold their cows, took out personal loans and raised nine hundred...

Vietnam: War's Lasting Legacy

More than three decades after the Vietnam War ended, the Vietnamese people continue to live with the consequences of Agent Orange, a defoliant that has come to symbolize the unintended consequences of warfare.

During the war, American forces sprayed nearly two million gallons of Agent Orange across...

This Week: When the Fish are Gone

Global warming, pollution and overfishing are killing the world’s oceans. Pulitzer Center grantees Erik Vance and Dominic Bracco II take us to the Sea of Cortez.

This Week: KISS in Class

Small class-sizes are great — if you happen to live in a wealthy country like the United States. In India, it's a different story.

This Week: Midas in Burkina Faso

Over the last two decades, Burkina Faso has emerged as Africa’s fourth largest exporter of gold, creating an ever-expanding army of child laborers.

This Week: Identity In Flames

The best journalism takes time — time to report, time to write. We urge you to take time to read two examples of long-form magazine journalism of the highest order.

This Week: A Stillborn Democracy

This week, millions of demonstrators poured into streets of cities and towns across Egypt to protest the many shortcomings of the country’s first democratically elected government.

This Week: Mine Control

Chinese dollars and the Chinese themselves have been pouring into Africa, mining the continent’s abundant resources, opening businesses, building infrastructure and generally making everyone nervous.