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Politics

From democracies to authoritarian regimes, government policies can have life and death stakes for citizens. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Politics” feature reporting on elections, political corruption, systems of government and political conflict. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on politics.

 

At the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

The Khmer Rouge Tribunal—"Asia's Nuremberg"—was created in 1997 to bring accountability for the Khmer Rouge era atrocities. 20 years and $320 million later, it has secured only three convictions.

Today, Explained: Democracy Dies in Daylight

Democracies can fall many ways: military coups, assassinations, mass protests. But what does it look like when a democracy quietly backslides into autocracy?

The Displaced Campesinos of Nicolas Ruiz

Forced to flee their homes by a paramilitary group, the campesinos of Nicolas Ruiz—a remote farming village in southern Mexico—have gathered in the city to demand justice and reparations.

Bangladesh: The (Un)Power of Women

As U.S. citizens missed their chance to elect a woman for president for the first time in 2008, Bangladeshis elected a female prime minister past December for the fourth time. Sheik Hasina is currently one of 11 female heads of state worldwide according to the Council of Women World...

Iran on the Edge

After a hotly contested presidential election that resulted in street riots and a disputed claim to a renewed mandate by President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Iran stands at a crossroads: between reformist and conservative leadership, between its revolutionary past and its post-revolutionary future.

Ahmadinejad's claimed landslide was met with...

Somaliland: A Land in Limbo

Somaliland, a breakaway region of Somalia, is Africa’s only fully unrecognized country. After breaking away from Somalia and claiming independence in 1991, the Somaliland government, in stark contrast to the failed state of Somalia, has constructed many facets of a functioning, stable state. Somaliland has carried out several Presidential elections and peaceful transfers of power.

South Asia's Troubled Waters

The majority of India's water sources are polluted. A lack of access to safe water contributes to a fifth of its communicable diseases. Each day in the booming, nuclear-armed nation, diarrhea alone kills more than 1,600 people.

The regional scenario is even more grim given the projected...

The Roots of Ethnic Conflict in Eastern DRC

The 2006 election in the Democratic Republic of Congo was supposed to usher in a new period of peace and stability for the beleaguered, exhausted Congolese people. Instead, it made one of the country's most intractable problems worse. After the election, the small but powerful Tutsi community in Eastern Congo...

Myanmar: The Kachin Struggle For Freedom

The Himalayan foothills of northern Myanmar form the ancestral homeland of the Kachins, an ethnic group that has endured decades of brutal repression at the hands of the Burmese military. Starting in 1962, the Kachin Independence Organization (KIO) waged a low-grade insurgency against the Burmese military. Today, a tenuous...

Greece's Student Intifadah

How does an affluent First World nation-state go from stability to near social collapse in the space of a week? What prompts a generation characterized by political apathy to flood into the streets? Why does a nouveaux-riche country with a slowing growth rate express its frustration with such violent...

Cambodia's Curse

For much of the world Cambodia brings to mind the horrors of the Khmer Rouge's killing fields. And because progress is assumed to have taken place in the three decades since, the world tends to overlook the state of affairs there today.

But contemporary Cambodia continues to...

Georgia and Beyond: Russia's Response to Separatism and Ethnic Conflict

The war between Russia and Georgia caught most of the world by surprise but it is a conflict that has long been brewing – and one that is part of a larger drama. The bigger context is Russia's attempt to regain the influence it enjoyed during the years of...

Yemen: In a Fragile State

The poorest nation in the Arab world struggles with high population growth, 40% unemployment and a persistent flow of refugees from Somalia. In the next decade, its 22 million citizens will compete for increasingly scarce water supplies, as aquifers are drilled, pumped and drained unsustainably.

This is...

One Step From Hell

In almost three decades of rule, Robert Mugabe's evolution from liberator to tyrant led Zimbabwe from democratic independence and its status as South Africa's breadbasket to a one-party state with an inflation rate over 231 million percent. Mugabe met early electoral wins by the opposition party Movement for Democratic...

Nepal: The Road to Peace

In April 2008 Nepal turned a corner. More than 60 percent of eligible voters turned out for elections to choose a new government tasked with abolishing the monarchy and forging a stable republic after a decade-long insurgency that claimed over 13,000 lives. Despite pre-election violence and intimidation, international observers...

Cuba: Tracey Eaton Highlights Recent Reporting

Pulitzer Center grantee Tracey Eaton highlights recent interviews with Cuba experts, including an economist and a former security agent, and the posting of the 100th video to his Cuba Money Project.

This Week in Review: Grabbing Gold

This Week
Grabbing Gold

From Eastern Europe to South America, soaring gold prices have triggered a global gold rush. Industrial mining companies—quite a few of them based in Canada—are muscling aside small local operations and laying waste to large swaths of previously pristine countryside. It is an under-reported crisis that has been on the Pulitzer Center’s radar for more than a year, and it now seems to be gaining some media traction.

This Week in Review: China's Stolen Children

This Week
A Bachelor Nation As Big As Texas

China’s draconian one-child policy helped check population growth in the world’s most populous country, but because of the ancient preference for sons, it has also thrown the country’s gender ratio completely out of whack. Today, for every 100 females in China, there are 120 males. In some areas the ratio is 100 to 150. This means that by 2020, China will have a nation of bachelors as large as the entire population of Texas.