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Politics

From democracies to authoritarian regimes, government policies can have life and death stakes for citizens. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Politics” feature reporting on elections, political corruption, systems of government and political conflict. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on politics.

 

When the Presses Stop

Bernie Krisher helped bring free journalism to Cambodia. Now, as the country reverts to autocracy, his paper has been shut down. Will he survive the heartbreak? Will Cambodia?

Manipur: Portraits of Resilience

Portraits of Resilience takes viewers up close to nine individuals to understand the delicate relationship between the Meiteis and the Loktak Wetland as well as their fight for survival.

Ecuador: Jungle Tensions

Chevron is accused of having dumped 18 billion gallons of toxic waste in Ecuador’s Amazonian rainforest, and local residents are determined to hold them accountable.

Iraq: Death of a Nation? (revisited)

"Iraq: Death of a Nation" examines how the U.S. invasion and occupation created a multi-faceted civil war in which the U.S. is now actively arming multiple factions. Last summer, the project focused on how Iraq's refugee crisis was created by the invasion and the fighting that has followed. This...

Understanding Iran

On the surface, Iran is simply a theocracy in a standoff with the United States. But access to the everyday lives of Iranians gives a window into the country's complex web of culture, religion and politics. Despite decades of repressive leadership, Iran arguably has the longest-lived democratic movement in...

Peru's Petroleum Play: Amazon Oil and Politics

Oil and gas finds are turning the eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains and the adjacent Amazonian lowlands of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia into a hydrocarbon hotspot.

Ethiopia: Tainted Ally

U.S.-backed Ethiopian troops grabbed headlines in late 2006, invading Somalia to drive the Islamic Courts Union from power. Less known is the Addis government's massive persecution of its own people.

It is true that Ethiopia is at war — with itself. For more than a century Ethiopian...

Kyrgyzstan on the Brink

Home to the sole U.S. forward operating base into Afghanistan, Kyrgyzstan maintains strong ties to Russia. With a compromised press, a bankrupted economy and intense religious tensions, the country is in danger of rolling back its few democratic advances.

Edil Baisalov, an activist who led Kyrgyzstan's 2005...

Venezuela's Hugo Chavez: Despot, or Democrat?

Andrew Cutraro and Guy Taylor uncloak the cult of personality surrounding the Bolivarian movement of Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez, and a policy of aggressive and orchestrated media relations.

Asia's Quiet Revolution

Tyler Marshall reports on the prodigious spread of China's geopolitical influence across southeast Asia and the western Pacific, often in territories long noted as American allies.

From Drought to Flood - Water Images Across the Globe

Water issues affect us all, from the women who spend hours daily fetching water to political battles over international rivers to melting icepack and rising sea levels. We are all downstream.

Worldwide, just under 900 million people lack reliable access to safe water that is free from disease and industrial waste. And forty percent do not have access to adequate sanitation facilities. The result is one of the world's greatest public health crisis: 4,500 children die every day from waterborne diseases, more than from HIV-AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis combined.

Censorship or Death: Russia's War Against a Free Press in the Caucasus

Since 1993, more than 35 journalists in Russia have been murdered for their work, of these some 14 were killed in Chechnya, the North Caucasus region or in St. Petersburg. About 19 journalists have been assassinated in retaliation for their reporting since Vladimir Putin came to power (including three in 2009).

World Water Day Writing Contest Winner: A Drop of Grace

For many of us, it's hard to envision a time when water will not be readily available. From drinking to cleaning, water is a constant and often underappreciated presence in our lives. But for 884 million people clean water is a precious commodity. And if we continue to deplete our clean water sources, it will inevitably affect us all.

Water and Peace: Security's Undercurrent

Specialists from across sectors gathered at the National Geographic Society on World Water Day, Monday, March 22, to share information on an issue seemingly so simple we often take it for granted.

But you don't have to be an expert to know about water.

Just ask the man who sold me my coffee today. "Well, that's obvious," he said of the event, "it doesn't matter what else people have; without water, they're going to go after each other to get it."

On Water, a Call to Action

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton pledged Monday to put water issues on the "front burner" of U.S. foreign policy. She told an audience of specialists and water advocates gathered at the National Geographic Society that solving the global challenge of safe water and sanitation was integral to every other U.S. interest.