Tags

Labor

A person’s labor is deeply intertwined with their economic status, quality of life and access to basic resources like food and clothing. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Labor” feature reporting that covers the rights of workers, efforts to organize labor unions and worker advocacy groups, modern slavery, and other forms of worker exploitation. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on labor.

 

Highway Through Hell

The human-smuggling route across the Sahara may have been the deadliest on Earth. Then the EU paid Niger’s army to shut it down — and made it even more treacherous.

The Deported

Europe is expelling thousands of Africans. To one Malian deportee, that looks like a recipe for revolution.

The Paradox Of Prosperity

Europe is spending billions of dollars to jump-start Africa’s poorest economies. But that may just accelerate the exodus.

The Boyfriend System: Migrant Life in Qatar

Zina laws treat sex and pregnancy out of wedlock as crimes punishable by imprisonment. But without means to seek legal recourse, it is mostly low-skilled migrant woman who face charges.

Philippines and Indonesia: The Cost of Gold

Tiny children and teens toil in the gold mines of the Philippines and Indonesia. A risky, often deadly, business, child labor is growing as families rush to exploit the worldwide demand for gold.

Russia: On The Move

After 20 years of fading industry, rampant corruption, and no clear ideology, Russia is now on the move. Its young people are finding new homes in—and out—of the country.

A Sharp Initiative

The Pulitzer Center and The College of William & Mary created a unique initiative to provide deeper global learning and storytelling experiences for students.

With support from William & Mary alumni, Anne and Barry Sharp, The College launched its Campus Consortium partnership in fall 2011 with the...

Fragile States: The Drug War in Central America

Billionaire Mexican drug mafias are muscling into Central America, undermining the region’s feeble governments and bringing violence to levels not seen since the civil wars of the 1970s and 80s.

Egypt: The Revolution Continues

In the wake of the uprising that ousted President Mubarak, Sharif Abdel Kouddous reports from Cairo, Egypt with Nicole Salazar on the struggle for democracy, social justice and economic reform.

China’s Rising Labor Movement

As China’s Pearl River Delta region moves toward higher-skilled manufacturing, a network of former migrant workers is organizing, educating and empowering the area’s workforce.

Dominican Republic: Life on the Margins

Some of the most marginalized people in the Caribbean are Haitian immigrants, and their descendents, living in the Dominican Republic.

Bangladesh: The (Un)Power of Women

As U.S. citizens missed their chance to elect a woman for president for the first time in 2008, Bangladeshis elected a female prime minister past December for the fourth time. Sheik Hasina is currently one of 11 female heads of state worldwide according to the Council of Women World...

This Week: The Nanny's Son

Millions of women from poor countries work as caregivers in America, part of a massive but largely invisible workforce.

This Week: India's Hospital Crisis

Pulitzer Center grantee Michael Edison Hayden first became interested in India's government hospitals after his wife gave birth to their son last May at Breach Candy Hospital in Mumbai.

This Week: Braving the Depths

There is no point in taking a camera down into the depths of an underwater compressor mine. There is nothing to see. But Larry Price's stark photography shows men working in this hellish occupation.