Tags

Investigative

Some news stories require greater investments of time to report, with journalists conducting exhaustive investigations using data, public and private records and interviews with a host of sources. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Investigative” feature in-depth reporting that delves deeply into serious issues. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on investigative journalism.

 

Lebanon’s Refugees Use Technology to Fight Food Insecurity

High poverty and unemployment rates among the world's 26 million refugees means that many are struggling with food security after fleeing their home countries. But in Lebanon, a U.N. pilot program is trying to use technology and digital innovations to provide food for hundreds of thousands of Syrians.

Conservation Capture

Dividends of South Africa’s biggest land claim settlement are benefiting less than a third of intended recipients. What does this mean for ecotourism on community land bordering the Kruger National Park?

How Missouri's Drug Task Forces Avoid Accountability

Court records show that Missouri’s federally funded drug task forces have often failed to set up required oversight commissions, failed to hold oversight meetings in public and repeatedly failed to respond to Sunshine Act requests for public information. 

Islam with Chinese Characteristics

China's Muslim minorities make up only two percent of the population, but comprise 20 million people. How do they relate to Islam, the state, the majority Han Chinese and one another?

Deadly Pollution: The World's Most Toxic Places

Pollution sickens and kills millions of people worldwide each year. This project explores the most toxic places with a focus on causes, consequences and possible solutions.

Ireland Still Rising After 100 Years?

It is being marked as the turning point for Irish freedom, but as they celebrate the centenary of the 1916 Easter Rising the Irish are far from free from the demands of global finance.

Nepal's Ticking Timebomb

The legacy of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal could last for decades. Scientists begin to understand why the badly shaken landscape is prone to landslides, especially during monsoons.

The Labor Train

An intimate profile of labor migrants making their way to Russia by train and bracing for—sometimes looking forward to—work and life in Moscow.

The Assad Files

A secretive team of war crimes investigators smuggled hundreds of thousands of documents out of abandoned government buildings in Syria. Then they built a case against Assad. Will a court take it?

How Al Shabaab Keeps Kenya in Its Crosshairs

A rare, detailed look at one of the world’s most important battles against terrorism. PBS NewsHour goes on the front lines as Al Shabaab tries to terrorize and recruit inside of Kenya.

The Panama Papers: Victims of Offshore

The Panama Papers is an investigation that reveals how the world's rich and powerful hide assets and skirt rules by setting up front companies in far-flung jurisdictions.

The Healing

One of the under-reported stories of Syria's Civil War is the deliberate targeting of hospitals by bombers, and the efforts of Syrian-American doctors to help their devastated homeland.

Children's Homes in El Salvador

More than 20 years after the end of its civil war, El Salvador remains plagued by violence and poverty. Kayli Plotner reports on what has happened to the country's children.

This Week: Stumbling Toward Nuclear War

This week: rising nuclear tensions through North Korea's eyes, refugees converting to Christianity, and how the exotic pet trade enables illegal wildlife practices in China.

This Week: The President's Wealth

This week: President Kabila's vast network of family-owned businesses, a comedy group in India fights ISIS with laughter, and Syrian refugees look for a sense of belonging in Germany.