Tags

Investigative

Some news stories require greater investments of time to report, with journalists conducting exhaustive investigations using data, public and private records and interviews with a host of sources. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Investigative” feature in-depth reporting that delves deeply into serious issues. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on investigative journalism.

 

Nigeria's Invisible Crisis

In one of the world's least recognized crises, hunger amplifies disease for millions fleeing the violence of Boko Haram in northeastern Nigeria.

The New Berliners

What is it like for refugees navigating life in Berlin after Syria?

Rana Plaza Today

Those who work in Bangladesh's textile industry know that a change in public opinion in the West could mean that they are out of a job.

Peru's Gold Rush: Wealth and Woes

A third of a million Peruvians make their living from gold mining, but illegal tactics and deforestation methods are damaging the environment and inflicting health risks on the local population.

The Plight of the Burmese in Thailand

Millions of Burmese cross over to Thailand to escape political, social and economic hardships. But labor traffickers prevent many Burmese from achieving a better life.

North Korea's Addicting Export: Crystal Meth

Cheap, available, and an antidote to hunger, crystal meth appears to be becoming the drug of choice both in North Korea, and in its porous border region with China.

Toxic Riches

Poorly regulated mining and refining facilities are causing enormous devastation, while corporate interests are pushing ever harder to exploit the untapped mineral resources of the continent.

Ghana: Oil City Stories

In December 2010, Ghana joined the league of oil-producers, determined to make oil a blessing and not a curse. Christiane Badgley visits Takoradi, a.k.a. Oil City to see how things are going so far.

A Soldier’s Gift

An American military medical facility has become one of the most active organ donor hospitals in Germany. That’s because a high percentage of mortally wounded U.S. troops are donating their organs in a country where organ donation is still a verboten topic.

Justice at Guantánamo

The tribunal of Noor Uthman Muhammed, the first terrorism suspect to be tried at Guantánamo Bay.

Drug Companies Skirt FDA By Going Abroad

Big drug companies are increasingly going overseas to test new drugs and devices on patients. It’s a good deal for the companies, but what about consumers?

This Week: A New Libya

Does anyone miss Qaddafi? Not really. But as Nicolas Pelham reports, the Libyan Revolution of 2011 has not delivered on the reforms that so many had anticipated. And the worst may be yet to come.

Review of Alan Weisman's 'Countdown'

Alan Weisman, the author of bestseller "The World Without Us," says population is going in the wrong direction to achieve ecological sustainability. In his new book, he looks at the world with us

This Week: The Lingering Disaster

Last April, the world was shocked and outraged by the Rana Plaza disaster—a building collapse that claimed the lives of more than 1,200 garment workers in a Dhaka sweatshop. Has anything changed?

This Week: KISS in Class

Small class-sizes are great — if you happen to live in a wealthy country like the United States. In India, it's a different story.

This Week: Midas in Burkina Faso

Over the last two decades, Burkina Faso has emerged as Africa’s fourth largest exporter of gold, creating an ever-expanding army of child laborers.