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Human Rights

According to the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. And yet around the world, many people are denied basic human rights, or find their rights under threat. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Human Rights” feature reporting that covers the fight for equality under the law, civil rights and the basic dignity afforded every person. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on human rights.

 

Chinese Tech Makes Cities ‘Smart,’ but Critics Say It Spreads Authoritarianism

Chinese 5G technology is designed to transmit huge amounts of data instantly, and deploy vast networks of surveillance cameras and facial recognition software. While dozens of countries around the world plan to adopt the innovation, human rights advocates and the U.S. are sounding the alarm. Nick Schifrin reports as part of "China: Power and Prosperity," with support from the Pulitzer Center.

How China’s High-Tech ‘Eyes’ Monitor Behavior and Dissent

Technology is transforming China, helping improve life in some ways, but also collecting big data. The government is beginning to convert that data and surveillance footage into social credit scores, which critics say can be used to penalize those who criticize the Communist Party. Nick Schifrin reports as part of "China: Power and Prosperity," with support from the Pulitzer Center.

How President Xi Jinping Is Transforming China at Home and Abroad

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s philosophy has been written into the country’s constitution. He has sought to raise the standard of living at home, while boosting China’s power and influence across the globe. But critics accuse him of consolidating power and creating a campaign of oppression against the Chinese people—especially those who disagree with him. Nick Schifrin reports from Beijing.

Cries in the Night: Life in the Limbo of a Mexican Shelter

A series of Trump Administration immigration rule changes have effectively sealed the border to the vast majority of asylum seekers, leaving tens of thousands of migrants in limbo, and shifting responsibility for U.S. immigration policy to the Mexican government and dozens of Mexican shelters.

Outsourcing Migrants

The Associated Press examines what happens to asylum-seekers when Europe and the United States close their doors, outsourcing migrants to other countries.

Examining Domestic Violence in Lagos, Nigeria

Lagos' secretive culture has made it harder to tackle domestic violence. Regardless, women are resisting the secrecy, changing the culture, and speaking about their experiences.

Borderland Sisterhood

In 2018, hundreds of nuns descended on the U.S.-Mexico border to volunteer in migrant shelters. Many have stayed to continue their work, citing a “calling” unlike any they have felt before.

Cops and Robbers

A Baltimore Sun investigation into a rogue squad of police officers who used the authority of the badge to commit crimes—and how they got away with it for so long.

The Psyche of Syria's War Survivors

This project profiles the courageous journey of Syrian teenage social media icon Muhammad Najem and sheds light on the psychological picture of refugees who live or have family under regime bombings.

Are We Visible Yet?

In spite of gender and economic disparity, women are often the innovators and change makers that move society forward, working far from the headlines. Choosing to be visible is key to equality.

Kenya, FGM, Prohibition, and the Law

Is the 2011 federal Prohibition of FGM Act in Kenya enough to end the practice of female genital mutilation? FGM is deeply rooted in Kenyan cultures, and critics say the law is not enough.

Nowhere To Hide: Saudis Targeted Abroad

The death of Jamal Khashoggi shocked the world—but he was far from the first Saudi dissident to be targeted abroad, and he is by no means the last.

The Last River

A series of reports on the threats and resistance activities linked to the defence of the last river free of large dams in the Tapajos river basin–now being strangled by a belt of deforestation and the constant expansion of agribusiness.

Meet the Journalists: Texas Tribune Staff

After a new federal immigration policy led to hundreds of children being separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border, The Texas Tribune opened a temporary South Texas bureau to investigate.

Meet the Journalist: Deborah Bloom

In a densely populated village outside Mombasa in Kenya, the effects of industrial pollution continue to harm inhabitants. Deborah Bloom chronicles an activist's fight against it.

Pulitzer Center Grantees Win 2019 Michael Kelly Award

Pulitzer Center grantees Maggie Michael, Nariman Ayman El-Mofty, and Maad al-Zikry were awarded the 2019 Michael Kelly Award for their Associated Press reporting on the cycles of epidemic, starvation and corruption faced by millions of civilians in Yemen's war.