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Human Rights

According to the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. And yet around the world, many people are denied basic human rights, or find their rights under threat. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Human Rights” feature reporting that covers the fight for equality under the law, civil rights and the basic dignity afforded every person. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on human rights.

 

The Survivors of the Rohingya Genocide

An investigation into Myanmar's state-orchestrated murder of thousands of Rohingya Muslims — and the second tragedy unfolding in the refugee camps

Kuchus in Uganda

As Uganda struggles with anti-homosexuality legislation, the growing LGBT-rights movement continues its fight against discrimination and criminalization.

Rwanda: We Are the Past

Today in Rwanda, the 1994 genocide is part of the past, but the country's thousands of maimed amputees are living reminders of the brutal horror.

Official Homophobia in Russia

With homophobic rhetoric now legitimized by federal law, being gay in Russia can be extremely dangerous.

A World of Widows

When grief is compounded by cruelty: Societies of widows, battling the stigma of exclusion and the lingering damage of war.

Honduras: "Aqui Vivimos"

"Honduras: Aqui Vivimos" ("Honduras: We Live Here") explores the social conditions—abject poverty, corruption, political disillusionment, and gang culture—that have made Honduras a violent country.

How Assad Hangs On

Many experts thought Assad would be out of power by now. But the initial popular uprising has devolved into religious and ethnic strife. Assad is seen by some as the best hope for stability.

Nepali Lives, Foreign Dreams

A special election in Nepal fuels hope for an end to years of gridlock but thousands of Nepalis are voting with their feet—leaving the country in pursuit of better opportunities.

Sex and Sanitation in Brazil

Prostitution is not illegal in Brazil. Yet a campaign to “clean-up” the country’s image ahead of the World Cup is rendering those working in Brazil’s sex industry increasingly vulnerable.

Enduring Rifts: Chile 40 Years After the Pinochet Coup

Four decades after the military overthrew Chile’s democratically-elected government, the past remains a vital force in the country. A look at elections, memory and reform in this wounded nation.

Powering Up Brazil

How can you provide power for a country of 200 million people? This series examines Brazil's energy needs as one of the biggest economic players.

Peacekeepers: The Congo Case

UN enforcement of "responsibility to protect" has too often focused more on protecting UN troops than civilian populations. In eastern Congo UN military leaders are talking—and taking—a tougher line.

Does Congo Really Need Us?

Some of the biggest criticisms of international aid are coming from self-reflective aid workers who question their role and the role of their employers in developing nations.

Telling the Anna Hazare Story

Anti-corruption leader Anna Hazare burst on the scene in early 2011, a mystery to most Indians and much of the world. He is no mystery in the village where he has put Gandhian principles to the test.

Jeffrey Stern and "The Last Thousand"

Jeffrey Stern, former Pulitzer Center grantee, publishes his first book about an Afghanistan minority—and the problems they encounter as the U.S. troops pull out.

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