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Human Rights

According to the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. And yet around the world, many people are denied basic human rights, or find their rights under threat. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Human Rights” feature reporting that covers the fight for equality under the law, civil rights and the basic dignity afforded every person. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on human rights.

 

Chinese Tech Makes Cities ‘Smart,’ but Critics Say It Spreads Authoritarianism

Chinese 5G technology is designed to transmit huge amounts of data instantly, and deploy vast networks of surveillance cameras and facial recognition software. While dozens of countries around the world plan to adopt the innovation, human rights advocates and the U.S. are sounding the alarm. Nick Schifrin reports as part of "China: Power and Prosperity," with support from the Pulitzer Center.

How China’s High-Tech ‘Eyes’ Monitor Behavior and Dissent

Technology is transforming China, helping improve life in some ways, but also collecting big data. The government is beginning to convert that data and surveillance footage into social credit scores, which critics say can be used to penalize those who criticize the Communist Party. Nick Schifrin reports as part of "China: Power and Prosperity," with support from the Pulitzer Center.

How President Xi Jinping Is Transforming China at Home and Abroad

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s philosophy has been written into the country’s constitution. He has sought to raise the standard of living at home, while boosting China’s power and influence across the globe. But critics accuse him of consolidating power and creating a campaign of oppression against the Chinese people—especially those who disagree with him. Nick Schifrin reports from Beijing.

Cries in the Night: Life in the Limbo of a Mexican Shelter

A series of Trump Administration immigration rule changes have effectively sealed the border to the vast majority of asylum seekers, leaving tens of thousands of migrants in limbo, and shifting responsibility for U.S. immigration policy to the Mexican government and dozens of Mexican shelters.

Women and Opportunity in Southern India

Praveena Somasundaram from Guilford College traveled to southern India to report on gender inequality in education and the difficulties and opportunities women face in the workplace in both urban and rural areas.

In Defiance and In Defense of Duterte

What happens to civil society in a country that democratically elects a leader who encourages the summary executions of citizens for drug addiction and the wholesale violation of human rights?

The Lasting Legacy of the Bhopal Gas Leak

More than 30 years after the world's worst industrial accident, the people of Bhopal are still dealing with its long-term and health and environmental fallout. Whose responsibility is it to help them?

A Woman's Crime and Punishment

When unmarried sex is outlawed, pregnancy out of wedlock is proof of a crime. Women are jailed—along with their babies.

Canada's Missing and Murdered Women

Over the past three decades, thousands of Canadian Aboriginal women have been murdered or gone missing. The government has begun investigating why indigenous women are so vulnerable to violence.

The Black Death of Kabwe

Years of unmitigated contamination from Zambia's largest lead mine have created a toxic nightmare for the residents of Kabwe, the country's second largest city.

India: Migrating Into Slavery

Each winter hundreds of thousands of Indians migrate north to man the world's second largest brick industry. They're promised opportunity, but many are bonded into debt.

Duterte and the Philippines

A new president is elected in the Philippines on a promise that he will crack down on drugs, dealers and users. Thousands of poor people have already been killed.

A Look Inside South Sudan's Bitter War

Mass killings, mass rape, ethnic cleansing, starvation and a lack of international will to act against the specter of genocide: A rare look inside the crisis in South Sudan.

Refugee Boom and Bust: A Global Gold Rush

From smugglers in Agadez, to factory owners in Turkey, to the Italian and Nigerian mafias in Italy, and small business owners in Greece, people making a killing off the global migrant crisis.

Latin America's Schindler

Roberto Kozak is virtually unknown. And yet this quiet man played a crucial role after the 1973 coup in Chile and he helped tens of thousands of prisoners out of custody and to find safe havens overseas.

Corporate Armies

A massive army has been built up around the world, not to fight traditional wars, but to protect corporate assets around the world.

This Week: Rohingya, The Lost Genocide

This week: As the world looks upon the Rohingya's plight, a refusal to acknowledge genocide; the fight to list mental health as a global health challenge; and the arduous process of finding schools for special needs children while abroad.

This Week: Where Domestic Abuse Is Tolerated

This week: a harrowing look into Russian domestic violence, a special investigation into how Jewish Federations spend their money, and how Qatar is jailing new mothers and their babies.

Syria's Children

This lesson introduces students to the Pulitzer Center e-book "Flight From Syria: Refugee Stories." Students examine and discuss the Syrian refugee crisis and its effect on children.

Museum of Current Crises

This lesson plan outlines a project that allows students the opportunity to connect with a contemporary crisis somewhere in the world.

Improving Students’ Blogging Skills

After a series of chats with Pulitzer Center journalists, students reflect on the experience in a creative yet relevant form of writing by producing a blog post.

U.S.-Cuba Relations

This lesson uses reporting by Tracey Eaton and Rachel Southmayd to support student understanding around the state of relations between the US and Cuba.