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Human Rights

According to the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. And yet around the world, many people are denied basic human rights, or find their rights under threat. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Human Rights” feature reporting that covers the fight for equality under the law, civil rights and the basic dignity afforded every person. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on human rights.

 

Refugees Find Hope and Despair on Lesbos

The arrival of over 500,000 refugees to the Greek island of Lesbos in 2015 has turned the eastern shoreline into a crisis zone. Locals, NGOs and volunteers have come together to care for arrivals.

Piapot Powwow

While the objective of Canada's residential schools was forced assimilation, First Nations culture is coming back in force. 

Censorship or Death: Russia's War Against a Free Press in the Caucasus

Since 1993, more than 35 journalists in Russia have been murdered for their work, of these some 14 were killed in Chechnya, the North Caucasus region or in St. Petersburg. About 19 journalists have been assassinated in retaliation for their reporting since Vladimir Putin came to power (including three in 2009).

Ninth Grade Students Learn from a Crisis Reporter

Students in the 9th grade have spent the semester working on action projects built around international crises such as the quake in Haiti and the war in Afghanistan. They have been spearheading plans that range from raising money for schools to establishing pen pals in distressed countries. On Monday, May 3, the 9th grade students attended a presentation by and discussion with Jason Motlagh, a reporter who has spent the last several years writing from Afghanistan. He also represented the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, with whom the students have been working.

Uganda: Response to Critics

Merco Vernaschi, for the Pulitzer Center

(Editor's note at end of post)

During the past week a few blogs have unleashed a wave of criticism on my work about child sacrifice in Uganda, questioning my ethics and values and the Pulitzer Center's guidelines. Much of the criticism has focused on the picture of Margaret Babirye Nankya, a child who was killed during a ritual sacrifice, and whose body was exhumed to be photographed.

Jason Motlagh interviewed by Kent State online newspaper

Jason Motlagh has only been out of college for six years, but he has already made a successful career for himself as a freelance journalist.

After graduating from college in 2004, he got a job as a fisherman on a commercial fishing boat in Alaska.

“I was looking forward to doing something more concrete after being in college and doing a lot of abstract stuff,” Motlagh said.