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Human Rights

According to the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. And yet around the world, many people are denied basic human rights, or find their rights under threat. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Human Rights” feature reporting that covers the fight for equality under the law, civil rights and the basic dignity afforded every person. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on human rights.

 

The Lost Genocide

The Rohingya have been stripped of citizenship, prevented from having children, and systematically murdered. But the United Nations may never be able to prosecute the Rohingya genocide.

Capital Offenses

Under President Rodrigo Duterte, thousands have died at the hands of police or the masked vigilantes who roam Manila's vast slums.

Migrant Life in Qatar

In Qatar and other Gulf countries, mostly low skilled migrant women pay the price for the crime of zina, which criminalizes unmarried sex and pregnancy out of wedlock.

What Now for the Girls of War-Torn Syria?

In a bombed-out husk of a building on the outskirts of Tabqa, Gayle Lemmon met a family trying to wait out the hell of life under ISIS in Raqqa and the war for its liberation.

Restaveks: Child Slaves of Haiti

Child slaves make up about 10 percent of the youth population in Haiti. Driven out of economic depravity, many parents are sending their children to live with others and serve as indentured servants in order to secure their survival. In a short documentary, Dane Liu and Carmen Russell explore the...

Beyond the Law: Colombia's Embrace of Paramilitary Power

Journalist Phillip Robertson and videographer Carlos Villalon investigate the controversies swirling around America's most important Latin American ally and what they mean for the people of Colombia.

Ethiopia: Tainted Ally

U.S.-backed Ethiopian troops grabbed headlines in late 2006, invading Somalia to drive the Islamic Courts Union from power. Less known is the Addis government's massive persecution of its own people.

It is true that Ethiopia is at war — with itself. For more than a century Ethiopian...

Mozambique: Paradise Lost, and Found?

Before the Mozambican civil war, Gorongosa National Park was among the top destinations in Africa, with a higher concentration of animals than on the famed Serengeti Plain. But during the war, soldiers and other poachers killed these vast herds, planted landmines and destroyed the park's infrastructure. By the 1990s,...

Cambodia: Of Vice and Men

French attorney Jacques Vergès has devoted a long career to defending terrorists, dictators and mass murderers. He has consistently challenged the wider social order judging his defendants. Critics call him a devil's advocate, and a scandalously immoral publicity seeker.

Stéphanie Giry found a more complex reality as...

Congo's Conflict: Profit and Loss

Conflicts in the Democratic Republic of Congo have resulted in millions of Congolese lives lost, while benefiting the trade of small arms and valuable minerals like coltan.

Another Darfur

As the world watches Darfur to the West, government harassments in East Sudan have forced hundreds of thousands from their homes. Like their counterparts in Darfur, eastern rebels complain that successive governments in Khartoum have left their region under-developed, whilst exploiting its natural resources.

East Sudan is...

This Week: A Government Shutdown

A government crackdown against dissidents? No, this is a government crackdown against sexual orientation. Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni last week signed a law that criminalizes homosexual acts.

This Week: My Brother's Keeper

Great photography is a Pulitzer Center hallmark and so is reporting of depth and insight, sometimes on stories in the news and sometimes on issues that should be.

This Week: Unwanted and Unprotected

Widowhood is not merely a tragic personal sorrow, it is a devastating state of diminishment that can trigger economic ruin and cruel social consequences that are felt for generations.

This Week: Braving the Depths

There is no point in taking a camera down into the depths of an underwater compressor mine. There is nothing to see. But Larry Price's stark photography shows men working in this hellish occupation.