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Ethnicity

Ethnicity is defined as a shared cultural heritage based on ancestry, language and customs that have endured for years. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Ethnicity” feature reporting that covers conflict between different ethnic groups, ancestral history and the customs that make ethnic groups unique in the world. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on ethnicity.

 

The Ethnic Face of the Pandemic in Colombia

COVID-19 is highlighting the difficulties that Indigenous and Afro-Colombians—many of whom live in scattered rural areas—have in accessing specialized medical services. The distances they must travel to reach a hospital reveal the ethnic face of the pandemic.

Valley of Unrest

There are now nearly one million Indian troops stationed in Kashmir—more than at the height of the insurgency in the Nineties. The Muslim-majority region and its residents face a rising tide of Hindu nationalism.

The 1857 Project: Extracting the Poison of Racism From America’s Soul

In its spring 2020 print issue, GJR explores the history of race in the Land of Dred Scott. Call it the 1857 project because one of the most important chapters in the nation’s story occurred here with the Dred Scott decision reading blacks out of the Constitution and the Lincoln-Douglas debates the next year over whether America could endure part slave and part free. 

Pickled Limes

Filmmaker Kalyanee Mam reflects on how her family has used food to heal and sustain themselves, from their time in Cambodia during the Khmer Rouge regime to their current experiences with COVID-19.

The 1857 Project

The 1857 Project tells the story of race in St. Louis, Missouri, and Illinois. The 1857 Dred Scott decision denying blacks humanity and the 1858 Lincoln-Douglas debates were the prelude to Civil War.

Battle to the Ballot Box

Voter suppression, harsh voter ID laws, and voter disenfranchisement are on the rise. How does this affect the competitive Democratic primary and United States' most-watched election?

Alaska Natives on the Front Line

Reporters explore Alaska Native resilience and cultural adaptation in the Arctic-termed ground zero for climate change- brought about by a rapidly shifting environment.

Congo's Illegal Timber

In the depths of the second-largest rainforest on the planet, an Indigenous community is waging a fight against industrial giants that are destroying their ancestral forest.

A Tale of Three Kings

MLK's legacy makes a mark with more than 900 streets named after him, including most recently, Kansas City, Mo. But from USA to Europe to Africa, how does that legacy look from those streets?

A Revolution for Puerto Rico's Afro-Latinos

In the midst of Puerto Rico's political crisis, its black communities fight for justice to address invisible racism, police oppression, gentrification, substandard schools, and economic disparities.

The Hour of Lynching: Vigilante Violence in India

Returning home after buying two milch cows, dairy farmer Rakbar Khan was lynched by a mob of “cow vigilantes”. His wife seeks meaning in mourning his death, while his perpetrators deny it.

Prayers of the Persecuted

Monika Bulaj is producing a visual atlas of threatened minorities and shared holy places.

Cafe Tekoa

What happens when a left-leaning Israeli filmmaker settles in a West-Bank settlement?

Basketball in Tibet

On the Tibetan plateau, an unlikely group of nomads, Buddhist monks, and yak-wool artisans have seen their lives change—through basketball. Can they also help change Tibet?

The Globalization of AFROPUNK

AFROPUNK connects the African Diaspora not only through music, but also socially and politically, proving it to be a global movement that parallels the current politics facing young South Africans.

Meet the Journalist: Joshua Kucera

Joshua Kucera traveled along the conventional border between Europe and Asia, from Istanbul's Bosphorus to the Russian Arctic—reporting on the people who live between East and West.

Meet the Journalist: Alice Su

China's Muslim minorities make up only two percent of the population, but comprise 20 million people. How do they relate to Islam, the state, the majority Han Chinese and one another?

This Week: Family Divided at the Border

This week: reunification dreams stall due to continuing crisis along the border, Cape Town's water issues run deep, and Bhopal's 34-year-old environmental disaster still plagues residents.

This Week: Kingdom of Women

This Week: A village in China where women rule, an island off British Columbia was supposed to be an economic salvation, and illegal mining is causing problems for Venezuela.

Okur: Thinking Like a Journalist

This lesson introduces students to Paul Salopek's Out of Eden walk and asks students to write a journalistic "milestone" describing their surroundings.

Is There Really Religious Conflict?

This lesson challenges students to take a position related to what is causing or fueling conflicts that could be labeled religious. Students create an argumentative research paper and presentation.

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