Tags

Ethnicity

Ethnicity is defined as a shared cultural heritage based on ancestry, language and customs that have endured for years. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Ethnicity” feature reporting that covers conflict between different ethnic groups, ancestral history and the customs that make ethnic groups unique in the world. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on ethnicity.

 

Coming to America: It's Not Like the Movie

Navigating the nuances of American racism is difficult for anyone, and especially so if you are a Black foreigner. In the context of Maine, the whitest state in America, it's even harder.

C19WP Foreword

In March, C. Zawadi Morris set out to gather first-person narratives of as many subjects as possible across Brooklyn for The COVID-19 Writers Project. The multimedia project captured 10 stories on video, through Zoom calls, to represent our digital thumbprint as a society yearning to connect despite social distancing.

AP Road Trip: In Mississippi, Black Voters Face Many Hurdles

The opposition to Black voters in Mississippi has changed since the 1960s, but it hasn’t ended. On the eve of the most divisive presidential election in decades, voters face obstacles such as state-mandated ID laws that mostly affect poor and minority communities and the disenfranchisement of tens of thousands of formerly incarcerated people.

Ethiopia: At Peace, and at War

Observers fear civilian casualties as Ethiopia’s Tigray region squares off against the federal government.

Migrants and Refugees Experience American Racism

Navigating race relations in the U.S. is a challenging task, particularly for Black migrants and refugees. This project explores how Black migrants in Maine confront racism following their arrival.

Armenia and Azerbaijan at War

Armenia and Azerbaijan are at war, and the consequences—humanitarian above all, but also political and international—are going to be profound.

Karabakh Crisis

As much of the world is paralyzed by the coronavirus, an active war has broken out with few people watching and fewer actors to reign it in.

Looking for America

The AP takes a road trip across the United States to talk to Americans as a nation disrupted grapples with COVID-19, an economic meltdown, protests for racial justice, and a turbulent election.

The 1857 Project

The 1857 Project tells the story of race in St. Louis, Missouri, and Illinois. The 1857 Dred Scott decision denying blacks humanity and the 1858 Lincoln-Douglas debates were the prelude to Civil War.

Battle to the Ballot Box

Voter suppression, harsh voter ID laws, and voter disenfranchisement are on the rise. How does this affect the competitive Democratic primary and United States' most-watched election?

Alaska Natives on the Front Line

Reporters explore Alaska Native resilience and cultural adaptation in the Arctic-termed ground zero for climate change- brought about by a rapidly shifting environment.

Congo's Illegal Timber

In the depths of the second-largest rainforest on the planet, an Indigenous community is waging a fight against industrial giants that are destroying their ancestral forest.

Meet the Journalist: Joshua Kucera

Joshua Kucera traveled along the conventional border between Europe and Asia, from Istanbul's Bosphorus to the Russian Arctic—reporting on the people who live between East and West.

Meet the Journalist: Alice Su

China's Muslim minorities make up only two percent of the population, but comprise 20 million people. How do they relate to Islam, the state, the majority Han Chinese and one another?

This Week: Family Divided at the Border

This week: reunification dreams stall due to continuing crisis along the border, Cape Town's water issues run deep, and Bhopal's 34-year-old environmental disaster still plagues residents.

This Week: Kingdom of Women

This Week: A village in China where women rule, an island off British Columbia was supposed to be an economic salvation, and illegal mining is causing problems for Venezuela.

Okur: Thinking Like a Journalist

This lesson introduces students to Paul Salopek's Out of Eden walk and asks students to write a journalistic "milestone" describing their surroundings.

Is There Really Religious Conflict?

This lesson challenges students to take a position related to what is causing or fueling conflicts that could be labeled religious. Students create an argumentative research paper and presentation.

Related Issues