Tags

Environment

Around the world, the environment is increasingly under threat from industrial pollution, business development of the wilderness and climate change. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Environment” feature reporting that covers climate change, deforestation, biodiversity, pollution, and other factors that impact the health of the world around us. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the environment.

 

Supertrees: Meet Indonesia’s Carbon Guardian

Indonesia’s mangroves are an incredibly effective tool against climate change — but they’re being cut down to grow shrimp and palm oil for you.

These 3 Supertrees Can Protect Us From Climate Collapse

Meet the trees, get to know their superpowers, and learn how scientists are trying to protect them.

Kerala: How to Waste

Alleppey, India, a tropical, tourist town connected by streams and canals, is facing the challenge of cleaning its water while dealing with the effects of climate change.

The Chiman Forest in Bolivia

With a sign that reads "Chimán, Mojeño, Yuracaré and Movima Indigenous Territory," the eviction of loggers from the Bolivian Chimán Forest has finally begun.

China: Power and Prosperity

PBS NewsHour has produced one of the most robust efforts about China by any American television program, covering everything from Belt and Road to the trade and technology wars to Xi Jinping to green vehicles.

These Trees Are Climate Superheroes

Tropical forests in Indonesia, Brazil, and Democratic Republic of Congo are under-appreciated superheroes regulating and rescuing the global climate. Here is the story of a few of those trees.

Dairyland in Distress

Dairy farms—Wisconsin's economic engines—have been decimated in recent years due to decreased demand, lack of workers, and slumping milk prices.

India's 'Compensatory' Forests

India is addressing deforestation by creating thousands of 'compensatory afforestation' projects. But is this big-ticket scheme a greenwash and a land grab?

Can the Amazon Rainforest Be Saved?

The Amazon rainforest is at a tipping point, with wide swaths of the forest being chopped down. As the planet's most important curb against climate change, saving the forest is of global importance.

The Dams Engulfing Forests

An investigation into the socio-environmental impacts caused by the construction of six hydroelectric dams on the Teles Pires river in Brazil's Mato Grosso state.

Meet the Journalist: Vince Beiser

"The most important solid substance on earth," Vince Beiser tells us, is sand—used to build skyscrapers and shopping malls from Boston to Beijing. But the world is running out.

Meet the Journalist: Fred Pearce

200 environmental and human rights activists are assassinated each year, according to Global Witness. Fred Pearce investigates the headline-grabbing slayings of three of these activists.

Meet the Journalist: Rachel Nuwer

Rachel is a Brooklyn-based freelance science journalist who is writing a book about the illegal wildlife trade. She traveled to Malawi and South Africa to report on the war on poaching.

Meet the Journalist: Wudan Yan

Palm oil has been condemned for rampant deforestation in Southeast Asia. How can the world produce more of it in a more sustainable manner? Journalist Wudan Yan investigated in Fall 2016.

This Week: Losing Earth

This week: the decade we almost stopped climate change, the U.S.-backed coalition in Yemen is paying Al-Qaeda militants, and Magnum photographers journey through six countries where indigenous people are fighting to keep the rights to their land.

Where Can I Be Safe?

A 12-year old girl questions the fate of the earth at the August 1 launch of the NYT Magazine article, "Losing Earth," by author Nathaniel Rich, at The Times Center in New York.

This Week: Family Divided at the Border

This week: reunification dreams stall due to continuing crisis along the border, Cape Town's water issues run deep, and Bhopal's 34-year-old environmental disaster still plagues residents.

This Week: Torture in Yemen's Prisons

Yemeni detainees being without charges decry abuse, the search for the Tasmanian tiger continues despite its supposed extinction, and the 2016 peace deal in Colombia has opened new areas to scientists.

Exotic Pets and Impacts on the Food Chain

Students will be able to describe the impacts of removing exotic animals from their native environment, including impacts on the food chain, using details from reporting by Sean Gallagher. Within...

Telling Science Stories: Data Visualization

This lesson shows students how journalists use data visualization to effectively communicate scientific issues—and directs students to create their own projects using the mapping platform CartoDB.

Exploring Other Countries

In this lesson, students use the Pulitzer Center website to research a specific country before giving an oral presentation. 

The Country a U.S. Corporation Left Behind

Students explore the impacts of the century-long relationship between Alcoa, an American corporation, and Suriname. They then debate the terms of Alcoa's exit from the country.