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Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

Beyond Parachute Journalism

Instead of grabbing the story and rushing away to publish, the Conservation Capture multimedia collaboration helped remote rural community members participate in the project.

Lebanon’s Refugees Use Technology to Fight Food Insecurity

High poverty and unemployment rates among the world's 26 million refugees means that many are struggling with food security after fleeing their home countries. But in Lebanon, a U.N. pilot program is trying to use technology and digital innovations to provide food for hundreds of thousands of Syrians.

WFP Uses New Tech to Fight Refugee Food Shortages in Jordan

Jordan is home to an estimated 3 million refugees, and the country's harsh terrain makes supplying food for them difficult. But to combat the food shortages, the U.N. World Food Program is using technologies like iris scans to track refugee spending habits and hydroponics to grow livestock feed.

Sucked Dry

Huge swaths of land acquired by foreign investors in Africa's Nile River Basin export profits and displace communities.

The World Without Wildlife

Demand for animals vastly outstrips availability. What are the forces driving the current poaching crisis, what we stand to lose if species fall, and what is being done to stop the killing?

Oji-Cree Youth: Connecting Cultures

For individuals and families living in the remote First Nations reserve of St. Theresa Point, life teeters between traditional expectations and encroaching Western influences, producing a lifelong tension.

The Office of Hope

In post-Chavez Venezuela, as an economic and political crisis threatens to plunge the country even deeper into chaos, daily life for many is a struggle for sustenance and safety.

Venezuela on the Brink

With food shortages, collapsing health care, spiraling violence, political chaos and an economy in free-fall, Venezuelans of all types are living out the slow collapse of their country.

Can Palm Oil Ever Be Grown Sustainably?

Palm oil—a product that appears in candy bars, cereal, and cosmetics—is a product the world needs. But can it be produced in an environmentally and socially sustainable manner?

Cuba and America: Honeymoon or Stalemate?

The US and Cuba are poised at the alter, prenuptials in hand. But as headlines forecast the fruits of the union and tourists flood Havana, there are already signs of unease.

Reviving a Chicken Economy

Economic development strategies that focus on job creation over direct aid gain traction in rural Haiti, offering insights on how to overcome longstanding challenges in addressing poverty.

The Labor Train

An intimate profile of labor migrants making their way to Russia by train and bracing for—sometimes looking forward to—work and life in Moscow.

Labor Policy in the 2012 Farm Bill

Every five years the federal government passes a Farm Bill to outline agriculture and food policy. This year, interest groups are trying to get a policy protecting farmworker rights included.

The Future of Democracy in China

Coming off of adventures in Asia during summer 2011, one traveler's questions shifted from whether China is ready for an Arab Spring to what the future of democracy looks like there.

Telling the Anna Hazare Story

Anti-corruption leader Anna Hazare burst on the scene in early 2011, a mystery to most Indians and much of the world. He is no mystery in the village where he has put Gandhian principles to the test.

This Week: Roads Kill

More than 1.2 million people are killed on the world’s roads each year—and that number is increasing. If nothing is done to reverse this trend, the annual death toll is on course to triple by 2030.

This Week: An Arab Spring in Ladies Lingerie

To have female sales clerks staff the ladies lingerie department would seem like a no-brainer, except that it took a royal decree two years ago by King Abdullah to make it happen in Saudi Arabia.

This Week: China's African Frontier

Veteran radio journalist and Pulitzer Center grantee Reese Erlich has a knack for getting himself into—and just as important, out of—hard places. Earlier this year, Reese reported from inside Iran.

This Week: From Malawi to Scotland

“She went back to her village and decided to live as if nothing had happened. Four years later, she was married. She said her husband didn't know anything about her past."

This Week: Hunger: A Fact of Life

Crop yields in sub-Saharan Africa rank among the lowest in the world, and nearly a third of the region’s people are chronically malnourished.

This Week: A New Libya

Does anyone miss Qaddafi? Not really. But as Nicolas Pelham reports, the Libyan Revolution of 2011 has not delivered on the reforms that so many had anticipated. And the worst may be yet to come.