Tags

Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

The Dirty Secret Behind the West's Coconut Fad

At a time when the demand for coconut products is exploding in the developed world, the 8 million farmers growing the fruit are far from benefiting — they face a widening gap between the value of their products in the West and what they earn.

It Took Me 16 Days to Walk From Colombia to Venezuela

Tens of thousands of Venezuelan migrants returned from Colombia to their native homes during the COVID-19 lockdown. Luis Guillermo Franquiz, a Venezuelan writer, was one of them. He lived and worked in Bogota. For 16 days, he walked to reach the border and crossed it. Luis Guillermo wrote his story.

The Triumph Over the River That Defeated Henry Ford (Spanish)

On the banks of the Tapajós River, one of the largest tributaries of the Amazon, a development policy was implemented years ago to turn the region into an important world corridor for Brazilian soybeans. There lies American car mogul Henry Ford’s failed factory city.

Inside Ohio's Migrant Camps

As COVID-19 cases rise in Ohio, migrant farmworkers live closely in cramped quarters. They remain one of the most vulnerable sectors of the population.

The Orange Areas of Central India

Over 1.5 million people in central India live in the crossfire of a 50-year old land dispute between two government departments over who governs lands known as Orange Areas.

Carbon Chronicles

With journalists in Indonesia and Brazil, the stories in this project highlight how tropical forests in Costa Rica, Indonesia, and Amazonia might ameliorate—or, to the contrary, aggravate—climate change. The project also explores the current impacts of climate change on people and wildlife.

At What Cost?

A Baltimore Sun investigation into Maryland’s child support system and the heavy price it exacts on Baltimore’s poorest families and communities.

Mission to Ukraine

Wisconsin Army National Guard members overseeing the training of Ukrainian armed forces are reluctant characters in the impeachment case against President Donald Trump.

Dashed Dreams: Haiti Since the 2010 Quake

“Dashed Dreams: Haiti Since the 2010 Quake” takes a look back at what’s transpired in Haiti since the earthquake and explores how far the politically-troubled country has come 10 years later.

Mapping Makoko

Makoko, one of the most crowded slums in Lagos, Nigeria, is finally being mapped—a project intertwined with the fight for property rights in the community.

How the Global Recycling System Collapsed

Vivienne Walt and Sebastian Meyer reported from the U.S. and Malaysia in their investigation of the failure of global plastics recycling.

Last of the Old Growth Loggers

Alaska's Native corporations preserved their cultures by logging their ancient forests. Can they lead the way to conserving what's left?

The Moving Meridian

How do farmers and rural towns in the Western United States reimagine their lives and businesses as the line dividing wet from dry marches east from the 100th Meridian, bringing arid land conditions with it?

Meet the Journalist: Melissa McCart

Restaurateur Mike Chen legally hired expert noodle-pullers from Taiwan to create an authentic noodle house in Pittsburgh, until the Trump administration’s immigration policy changes put an end to it.

Meet the Journalist: Mark O'Connell

Mark O'Connell travels to New Zealand to investigate how an extremist libertarian manifesto from 1997 influenced Silicon Valley libertarians like Peter Thiel to acquire apocalypse boltholes in New Zealand.

Meet the Journalist: Estacio Valoi

Oxpeckers Investigative Environmental Journalism's Estacio Valoi discusses Kruger's contested borderlands and how he overcame the challenges of reporting in a remote zone by using new media tools.

Meet the Journalist: Daniel Brook

Daniel Brook reports on the building of instant, modern cities in the developing world and examines the effects of major infrastructure projects on citizens living in Mexico, China, and India.

Meet the Journalist: Nate Tabak

How did a little village in Albania come be known as Europe's unofficial marijuana capital? Nate Tabak discusses his project about Lazarat, and the rise and fall of its marijuana business.

Meet the Journalist: Max Duncan

Filmmaker and video journalist Max Duncan introduces his project about a family from a remote corner of China. The parents left their children behind in order to give them a better future.

Exploring Other Countries

In this lesson, students use the Pulitzer Center website to research a specific country before giving an oral presentation. 

The Country a U.S. Corporation Left Behind

Students explore the impacts of the century-long relationship between Alcoa, an American corporation, and Suriname. They then debate the terms of Alcoa's exit from the country.