Tags

Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

Jerusalem and the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process

Spending a day in the East Jerusalem's Muslim Quarter highlights the beauty of the Palestinain food culture, spotlights the Palestinian struggle, and personifies the daily clash of people, politics, and religion in one of the world's most disputed cities. 

 

Nablus: Food and Resistance

Nablus has garnered a storied reputation as a refuge for radicals and a symbol for Palestinian resistance. But it also holds some of the richest culinary and agricultural traditions in the West Bank.

Impact of U.S.-China Trade War Felt in Both Countries

For decades, the world's two largest economies — the U.S. and China — have been integrated. But the Trump administration is now trying to undo that, as an escalating trade war impacts consumers and businesses in both countries.

China’s Massive Belt and Road Initiative Builds Global Infrastructure — and Influence

China’s Belt and Road Initiative is the most expensive infrastructure project in history. Chinese companies are constructing roads, pipelines and railroads across the globe. But they are also building China’s influence, and critics in the U.S. and Asia worry Belt and Road projects can reduce countries’ sovereignty and grow Chinese power. With the help of the Pulitzer Center, Nick Schifrin reports.

How President Xi Jinping Is Transforming China at Home and Abroad

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s philosophy has been written into the country’s constitution. He has sought to raise the standard of living at home, while boosting China’s power and influence across the globe. But critics accuse him of consolidating power and creating a campaign of oppression against the Chinese people—especially those who disagree with him. Nick Schifrin reports from Beijing.

Taking Stock of China’s Growing Power and Prosperity

When it comes to military strength, the global economy, and global influence, the two most important countries in the world are China and the U.S. And in recent years, both sides of that rivalry have become more combative.

The Panama Papers: Victims of Offshore

The Panama Papers is an investigation that reveals how the world's rich and powerful hide assets and skirt rules by setting up front companies in far-flung jurisdictions.

Niger: Baho's Last Fight

Poverty and unemployment have driven some youth in southern Niger to form violent gangs known as palais—attractive recruitment targets for Boko Haram. But one man is fighting back.

The Great Land Rush

A race has begun for one of the world's most precious resources—land. Investors are pouring in billions. They promise progress, but land grabs can upend livelihoods and stir bitter conflict.

The Life Equation

Big Data is coming to global health. But who should decide who lives and dies: Doctors on the front lines or a mathematical formula?

From the U.S. to Israel: Follow the Money

U.S. administration defines Jewish settlements as an obstacle to peace, yet allows millions in subsidized donations to help sustain them. How does it work? Investigative journalist Uri Blau digs deep.

The Corporate Balkanization of Nation States

Control over its territory has always been considered the fundamental characteristic of the state itself. What happens when historic levels of territory are given over to corporate interests?

India's Entrepreneurial Answer to Healthcare

A weak public health system has given rise to market-based approaches in India. A new breed of young tech-savvy entrepreneurs are building businesses to help more Indians have access to healthcare.

Prevention + Cure

Northern Europe can teach important lessons about how to help slow, and to prepare for, global warming. We report on the relatively low carbon foot print of northern Europe and sea-level-rise plans.

Maasai Women: Breaking Out of the Boma

New economic demands are forcing Maasai women into the workforce. While facing fierce backlash for their work, they are joining together to redefine women's roles within their patriarchal world.

Telling the Anna Hazare Story

Anti-corruption leader Anna Hazare burst on the scene in early 2011, a mystery to most Indians and much of the world. He is no mystery in the village where he has put Gandhian principles to the test.

This Week: A New Libya

Does anyone miss Qaddafi? Not really. But as Nicolas Pelham reports, the Libyan Revolution of 2011 has not delivered on the reforms that so many had anticipated. And the worst may be yet to come.

Review of Alan Weisman's 'Countdown'

Alan Weisman, the author of bestseller "The World Without Us," says population is going in the wrong direction to achieve ecological sustainability. In his new book, he looks at the world with us

This Week: The Lingering Disaster

Last April, the world was shocked and outraged by the Rana Plaza disaster—a building collapse that claimed the lives of more than 1,200 garment workers in a Dhaka sweatshop. Has anything changed?

This Week: Childhood Betrayed

We are excited to announce that our award-winning e-books, "In Search of Home" and "Voices of Haiti," are now available on Amazon.

This Week: Midas in Burkina Faso

Over the last two decades, Burkina Faso has emerged as Africa’s fourth largest exporter of gold, creating an ever-expanding army of child laborers.

This Week: Identity In Flames

The best journalism takes time — time to report, time to write. We urge you to take time to read two examples of long-form magazine journalism of the highest order.