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Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

Britain’s Warfare State

Britain sought to retain its imperial clout as the Empire crumbled after the Second World War by seeking to dominate the arms industry. This is a major investigation of the contemporary results.

No Man's Land

One of Indonesia’s biggest agricultural industries is also one of its filthiest. A visit to the palm-oil plantations and the people whose lives are shaped by this demanding crop.

The Displaced Campesinos of Nicolas Ruiz

Forced to flee their homes by a paramilitary group, the campesinos of Nicolas Ruiz—a remote farming village in southern Mexico—have gathered in the city to demand justice and reparations.

The Great Land Rush

A race has begun for one of the world's most precious resources—land. Investors are pouring in billions. They promise progress, but land grabs can upend livelihoods and stir bitter conflict.

The Life Equation

Big Data is coming to global health. But who should decide who lives and dies: Doctors on the front lines or a mathematical formula?

From the U.S. to Israel: Follow the Money

U.S. administration defines Jewish settlements as an obstacle to peace, yet allows millions in subsidized donations to help sustain them. How does it work? Investigative journalist Uri Blau digs deep.

The Corporate Balkanization of Nation States

Control over its territory has always been considered the fundamental characteristic of the state itself. What happens when historic levels of territory are given over to corporate interests?

India's Entrepreneurial Answer to Healthcare

A weak public health system has given rise to market-based approaches in India. A new breed of young tech-savvy entrepreneurs are building businesses to help more Indians have access to healthcare.

Prevention + Cure

Northern Europe can teach important lessons about how to help slow, and to prepare for, global warming. We report on the relatively low carbon foot print of northern Europe and sea-level-rise plans.

Maasai Women: Breaking Out of the Boma

New economic demands are forcing Maasai women into the workforce. While facing fierce backlash for their work, they are joining together to redefine women's roles within their patriarchal world.

Meet Tim Judah

Scotland is expected to hold a referendum within the next two years on independence from the United Kingdom. Pulitzer Center grantee Tim Judah reports on the implications of a split.

Labor Policy in the 2012 Farm Bill

Every five years the federal government passes a Farm Bill to outline agriculture and food policy. This year, interest groups are trying to get a policy protecting farmworker rights included.

The Future of Democracy in China

Coming off of adventures in Asia during summer 2011, one traveler's questions shifted from whether China is ready for an Arab Spring to what the future of democracy looks like there.

This Week: Roads Kill

More than 1.2 million people are killed on the world’s roads each year—and that number is increasing. If nothing is done to reverse this trend, the annual death toll is on course to triple by 2030.

This Week: An Arab Spring in Ladies Lingerie

To have female sales clerks staff the ladies lingerie department would seem like a no-brainer, except that it took a royal decree two years ago by King Abdullah to make it happen in Saudi Arabia.

This Week: China's African Frontier

Veteran radio journalist and Pulitzer Center grantee Reese Erlich has a knack for getting himself into—and just as important, out of—hard places. Earlier this year, Reese reported from inside Iran.

This Week: From Malawi to Scotland

“She went back to her village and decided to live as if nothing had happened. Four years later, she was married. She said her husband didn't know anything about her past."

This Week: Hunger: A Fact of Life

Crop yields in sub-Saharan Africa rank among the lowest in the world, and nearly a third of the region’s people are chronically malnourished.

The Impact of 'Polish Gold'

Students will learn about the effects of burning coal in Poland and apply their analyses of the articles to create a presentation that they feel will best support advocacy for coal regulation.

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