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Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

Jerusalem and the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process

Spending a day in the East Jerusalem's Muslim Quarter highlights the beauty of the Palestinain food culture, spotlights the Palestinian struggle, and personifies the daily clash of people, politics, and religion in one of the world's most disputed cities. 

 

Nablus: Food and Resistance

Nablus has garnered a storied reputation as a refuge for radicals and a symbol for Palestinian resistance. But it also holds some of the richest culinary and agricultural traditions in the West Bank.

Impact of U.S.-China Trade War Felt in Both Countries

For decades, the world's two largest economies — the U.S. and China — have been integrated. But the Trump administration is now trying to undo that, as an escalating trade war impacts consumers and businesses in both countries.

China’s Massive Belt and Road Initiative Builds Global Infrastructure — and Influence

China’s Belt and Road Initiative is the most expensive infrastructure project in history. Chinese companies are constructing roads, pipelines and railroads across the globe. But they are also building China’s influence, and critics in the U.S. and Asia worry Belt and Road projects can reduce countries’ sovereignty and grow Chinese power. With the help of the Pulitzer Center, Nick Schifrin reports.

How President Xi Jinping Is Transforming China at Home and Abroad

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s philosophy has been written into the country’s constitution. He has sought to raise the standard of living at home, while boosting China’s power and influence across the globe. But critics accuse him of consolidating power and creating a campaign of oppression against the Chinese people—especially those who disagree with him. Nick Schifrin reports from Beijing.

Taking Stock of China’s Growing Power and Prosperity

When it comes to military strength, the global economy, and global influence, the two most important countries in the world are China and the U.S. And in recent years, both sides of that rivalry have become more combative.

Beyond 7 Billion

The largest generation in history is entering its prime childbearing years, poised to add 2 billion more people to the planet. Ken Weiss investigates the causes and consequences of such rapid growth.

Tajikistan: Drugs, Guns, Water

Tajikistan is chronically unstable and corrupt—and now bracing for more chaos from Afghanistan. Its president is staking his country's future on the biggest dam in the world.

The Fight Over Chile's Marine Resources

Chile's coastal waters are among the richest in the world, but years of exploitation have exacted a toll on resources. As Congress debates a solution, fishing outfits scrap for their survival.

China's Bloody Frontier in Zambia

China's investment in Zambia holds promise: billions of dollars and thousands of jobs. But after violent conflict between Zambian miners and their Chinese supervisors, does it also pose a threat?

Britain: Charting the Impact of Austerity

Britain's government is engaged in the steepest deficit reduction of modern times. A team of reporters from the Financial Times tracks the cuts and their impact.

Chicago and Guatemala: Too Young to Die

“Too Young to Die” is a long-term exploration of the tragedy gun violence exacts on Chicago’s streets. Although over 100 children and young people died in 2012, their deaths are often overshadowed.

Organic Agriculture and Cooperative Farming in Cuba

Farm workers at Organoponico Vivero Alamar, an organic, sustainable farm in Cuba can earn more than government employees. This project explores what other countries can learn from Cuba's model.

Shale Gas: From Poland to Pennsylvania

Shale gas is an energy phenomenon not just in a broad swath of the United States but in places like eastern Europe, too. In both regions there is a tangled mix of hopes, hype, and concern.

Drawing the Line: The U.S.- Mexico Border

Louie Palu explores the U.S.-Mexico border where violence runs rampant: What does it look like? How has the immigration policy evolved? And what are the economic and security issues?

This Week in Review: Grabbing Gold

This Week
Grabbing Gold

From Eastern Europe to South America, soaring gold prices have triggered a global gold rush. Industrial mining companies—quite a few of them based in Canada—are muscling aside small local operations and laying waste to large swaths of previously pristine countryside. It is an under-reported crisis that has been on the Pulitzer Center’s radar for more than a year, and it now seems to be gaining some media traction.

This Week in Review: Libya's Sexual Revolution

This Week
Libya's Most Eligible Bachelors

After toppling a string of dictators across the region, the Arab Spring can also claim credit for launching a sexual revolution of sorts. Ellen Knickmeyer, writing for Foreign Policy, reports that young men in Libya, especially those who took up arms against the Qaddafi regime, suddenly find themselves looking more attractive to women.

Haiti Coverage Wins National Press Club Award

Pulitzer Center's reporting projects on post-earthquake Haiti, produced in collaboration with leading news-media outlets and YouTube, is co-winner of Joan Friedenberg Award for online journalism.

From Drought to Flood - Water Images Across the Globe

Water issues affect us all, from the women who spend hours daily fetching water to political battles over international rivers to melting icepack and rising sea levels. We are all downstream.

Worldwide, just under 900 million people lack reliable access to safe water that is free from disease and industrial waste. And forty percent do not have access to adequate sanitation facilities. The result is one of the world's greatest public health crisis: 4,500 children die every day from waterborne diseases, more than from HIV-AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis combined.