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Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

Jerusalem and the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process

Spending a day in the East Jerusalem's Muslim Quarter highlights the beauty of the Palestinain food culture, spotlights the Palestinian struggle, and personifies the daily clash of people, politics, and religion in one of the world's most disputed cities. 

 

Nablus: Food and Resistance

Nablus has garnered a storied reputation as a refuge for radicals and a symbol for Palestinian resistance. But it also holds some of the richest culinary and agricultural traditions in the West Bank.

Impact of U.S.-China Trade War Felt in Both Countries

For decades, the world's two largest economies — the U.S. and China — have been integrated. But the Trump administration is now trying to undo that, as an escalating trade war impacts consumers and businesses in both countries.

China’s Massive Belt and Road Initiative Builds Global Infrastructure — and Influence

China’s Belt and Road Initiative is the most expensive infrastructure project in history. Chinese companies are constructing roads, pipelines and railroads across the globe. But they are also building China’s influence, and critics in the U.S. and Asia worry Belt and Road projects can reduce countries’ sovereignty and grow Chinese power. With the help of the Pulitzer Center, Nick Schifrin reports.

How President Xi Jinping Is Transforming China at Home and Abroad

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s philosophy has been written into the country’s constitution. He has sought to raise the standard of living at home, while boosting China’s power and influence across the globe. But critics accuse him of consolidating power and creating a campaign of oppression against the Chinese people—especially those who disagree with him. Nick Schifrin reports from Beijing.

Taking Stock of China’s Growing Power and Prosperity

When it comes to military strength, the global economy, and global influence, the two most important countries in the world are China and the U.S. And in recent years, both sides of that rivalry have become more combative.

Gold, Guns and Garimpeiros

As jittery investors have sought safe-haven investments in gold during the recession, the metal's price has soared on world markets.

Can Biotechnology Save Africa?

African farmers already struggle to grow sufficient maize, which is a thirsty, fertilizer-hungry crop. What will happen as the climate changes and the population grows?

South Asia: Economics of Security

"The Economics of Security" explores the threat of extremist violence in South Asia, especially Pakistan, and its possible remedies.

India: Water for All?

In September 2007, the government of Maharashtra, India, invited bids from private companies for the completion of the Nira-Deogarh water project in the Satara district of Maharashtra. The construction of the dam was completed some years prior to this, but canals for irrigation and distribution were not. It was...

Latvia: Coping with Economic Collapse

For more than a decade the ex-Soviet republic of Latvia was a poster child of seamless transition to a prosperous post-Communist world. It entered the European Union in 2004 and for several years thereafter posted one of Europe's highest growth rates, fueled by access to cheap credit and domestic...

Southern Africa: Sustainable Hunting?

The black rhino is emblematic of how civil war and corruption in Africa decimate endangered animal populations and rob local economies of potential sources of income. Black rhinos have declined from 65,000 in 1970 to 4,000 today due to crises in Mozambique, Angola, and, now, Zimbabwe.

Since...

Guatemala: Forgotten Trauma

Samuel Loewenberg ventures to Guatemala to survey the underlying issues of the Central American country's extreme poverty. There, income inequality equals the worst in Africa - particularly among indigenous communities. In some regions, an estimated 75 percent of the children from infants to the ages of 6 and 7...

Tajikistan: Winter of Discontent

The global financial crisis is now reverberating deep inside the Tajikistan's mountainous countryside, where tens of thousands of Tajik men who no longer have jobs in Russia have returned to their villages. In a country already straining to accommodate Tajik refugees from Afghanistan, the government's chronic mismanagement has amplified the power and food shortages that permeate the countryside.

Myanmar: The Kachin Struggle For Freedom

The Himalayan foothills of northern Myanmar form the ancestral homeland of the Kachins, an ethnic group that has endured decades of brutal repression at the hands of the Burmese military. Starting in 1962, the Kachin Independence Organization (KIO) waged a low-grade insurgency against the Burmese military. Today, a tenuous...

Paradise Lost, and Found? Panel and Reception, 05/02

Gorongosa National Park was once among the most popular destinations in Africa – a place where movie stars and astronauts vacationed, where animal herds were denser than on the famed Serengeti Plain. But Mozambique's long civil war turned this natural wonderland into a battlefield. By the time the war ended in 1992, Gorongosa was a wasted, abandoned, empty place – yet another African casualty in a century filled with tragedies.