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Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

Can Sustainable Farming Save Iowa’s Precious Soil and Water?

Iowa is a powerhouse producer of corn and soybeans. But all the industrial farming has come at a cost to the environment. Today, there's a growing number of farmers adopting more sustainable practices in a bid to save Iowa's precious soil and water.

Haiti and the Failed Promise of US Aid

After an earthquake struck in 2010, the US pledged to help rebuild the Caribbean country. A decade later, nothing better symbolises the failure of these efforts than the story of a new port that was promised but never built.

Why China’s Art Market Is Evolving From Knockoffs to New Works

In the past, China was better known for producing 75 percent of the world’s art knockoffs than for its own creative innovation. Today, that is changing, as Chinese artists are reviving what they call the country’s “cultural aristocracy” by producing original art.

Nablus: Food and Resistance

Nablus has garnered a storied reputation as a refuge for radicals and a symbol for Palestinian resistance. But it also holds some of the richest culinary and agricultural traditions in the West Bank.

Jerusalem and the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process

Spending a day in the East Jerusalem's Muslim Quarter highlights the beauty of the Palestinain food culture, spotlights the Palestinian struggle, and personifies the daily clash of people, politics, and religion in one of the world's most disputed cities. 

 

The Next Yellowstone

Are the super rich better equipped than the federal government to save America's disappearing wildlands?

A Revolution for Puerto Rico's Afro-Latinos

In the midst of Puerto Rico's political crisis, its black communities fight for justice to address invisible racism, police oppression, gentrification, substandard schools, and economic disparities.

If This Hair Could Talk

Women in some of the most impoverished areas of Cambodia sell their hair as a means of survival. But are they being exploited for vanity an unregulated hair industry?

A Cryptocurrency Rush In The Grey Zone

Why is there a rush for cryptocurrencies in places that don't exist? A story set in the post-Soviet space, where ultra-libertarianism meets kleptocracy and sanctions evasion.

Bolsonaro's Brazil

This series looks at the potential consequences of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro's pledges to expand deforestation in the Amazon

PBS NewsHour Weekend 'Future of Food' Series

Can we create a nutritious and affordable food system in a way that’s green and fair? PBS NewsHour Weekend’s "Future of Food" international series reports on work by people who think they have solutions.

Before Ferguson, Beyond Ferguson

Families of color have long been thwarted in finding a quality education. We present the saga of one St. Louis family, how they got educated and managed to gain their purchase on the American Dream.

China: Power and Prosperity

PBS NewsHour has produced one of the most robust efforts about China by any American television program, covering everything from Belt and Road to the trade and technology wars to Xi Jinping to green vehicles.

Dairyland in Distress

Dairy farms—Wisconsin's economic engines—have been decimated in recent years due to decreased demand, lack of workers, and slumping milk prices.

Meet the Journalist: Melissa McCart

Restaurateur Mike Chen legally hired expert noodle-pullers from Taiwan to create an authentic noodle house in Pittsburgh, until the Trump administration’s immigration policy changes put an end to it.

Meet the Journalist: Mark O'Connell

Mark O'Connell travels to New Zealand to investigate how an extremist libertarian manifesto from 1997 influenced Silicon Valley libertarians like Peter Thiel to acquire apocalypse boltholes in New Zealand.

Meet the Journalist: Estacio Valoi

Oxpeckers Investigative Environmental Journalism's Estacio Valoi discusses Kruger's contested borderlands and how he overcame the challenges of reporting in a remote zone by using new media tools.

Meet the Journalist: Daniel Brook

Daniel Brook reports on the building of instant, modern cities in the developing world and examines the effects of major infrastructure projects on citizens living in Mexico, China, and India.

This Week: Living on the Margins

This week: Economic despair drives migration to Moscow, the Catholic Church's response to Duterte's killings, and PBS NewsHour revisits reporting on the US's nuclear arsenal.

Privatizing Education in Africa

This week: for-profit schools in the most impoverished places; identifying bodies from the U.S.-Mexico border; and age-based asylum in Sweden.

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