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Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

The Last Hunt

A look at how climate change is challenging Native communities across rural Alaska where hunting, fishing and foraging for food anchors cultures and economies.

Nicaragua's Transoceanic Canal

Colossal. Mammoth. Pharaonic. Those are the words that describe the Chinese-backed proposal to build a 170-mile interoceanic canal across Nicaragua. But can it be built, and, if so, at what cost?

The Geography of Poverty

The Geography of Poverty is a digital documentary project that combines geotagged photographs with census data to create a modern portrait of poverty in the US.

Nicaragua Canal

Nicaragua says a $50 billion interoceanic canal would give the country the economic boost it needs to escape grinding poverty. But environmentalists and scientists say the project is poorly planned.

Poland: Coal’s Deadly Toll

Poland gets 90 percent of its power and much of its heat by burning coal, one of the dirtiest of fuels. The consequences for Poles' health are severe, and one polluted city is now pushing back

Innovating the Rwandan Recovery

More than twenty years after a genocide, a look at the next generation of Rwandans and their place in a rapidly changing country.

The Business of Aid

Aid agencies and NGOs are increasingly partnering with large corporations. Is this the answer to global development in the 21st century—or is it just corporate welfare for the One Percent?

The Megacity Initiative

The Megacity Initiative is a new media venture investigating the sustainable development of burgeoning urban centers around the world in order to more prudently integrate future city dwellers.

Beijing's 'Rat Tribe'

Living beneath Beijing's skyscrapers and residential blocks are an estimated 1 million migrant workers. Dubbed the "Rat Tribe", these low-wage workers make a home in windowless basement cubicles.

Guatemala: Meeting Global Demand for Coffee

Organic and fair trade coffee producers in the Western Highlands of Guatemala can earn more than conventional growers. This project explores the costs and benefits of obtaining these certifications.

Meet Tim Judah

Scotland is expected to hold a referendum within the next two years on independence from the United Kingdom. Pulitzer Center grantee Tim Judah reports on the implications of a split.

Labor Policy in the 2012 Farm Bill

Every five years the federal government passes a Farm Bill to outline agriculture and food policy. This year, interest groups are trying to get a policy protecting farmworker rights included.

The Future of Democracy in China

Coming off of adventures in Asia during summer 2011, one traveler's questions shifted from whether China is ready for an Arab Spring to what the future of democracy looks like there.

Telling the Anna Hazare Story

Anti-corruption leader Anna Hazare burst on the scene in early 2011, a mystery to most Indians and much of the world. He is no mystery in the village where he has put Gandhian principles to the test.

This Week: An Arab Spring in Ladies Lingerie

To have female sales clerks staff the ladies lingerie department would seem like a no-brainer, except that it took a royal decree two years ago by King Abdullah to make it happen in Saudi Arabia.

This Week: China's African Frontier

Veteran radio journalist and Pulitzer Center grantee Reese Erlich has a knack for getting himself into—and just as important, out of—hard places. Earlier this year, Reese reported from inside Iran.

This Week: From Malawi to Scotland

“She went back to her village and decided to live as if nothing had happened. Four years later, she was married. She said her husband didn't know anything about her past."

This Week: Hunger: A Fact of Life

Crop yields in sub-Saharan Africa rank among the lowest in the world, and nearly a third of the region’s people are chronically malnourished.

This Week: A New Libya

Does anyone miss Qaddafi? Not really. But as Nicolas Pelham reports, the Libyan Revolution of 2011 has not delivered on the reforms that so many had anticipated. And the worst may be yet to come.