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Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

Britain’s Warfare State

Britain sought to retain its imperial clout as the Empire crumbled after the Second World War by seeking to dominate the arms industry. This is a major investigation of the contemporary results.

No Man's Land

One of Indonesia’s biggest agricultural industries is also one of its filthiest. A visit to the palm-oil plantations and the people whose lives are shaped by this demanding crop.

The Displaced Campesinos of Nicolas Ruiz

Forced to flee their homes by a paramilitary group, the campesinos of Nicolas Ruiz—a remote farming village in southern Mexico—have gathered in the city to demand justice and reparations.

The Weight of Numbers: Air Pollution and PM2.5

Larry C. Price visited seven countries to examine the impacts of PM2.5 air pollution, and to uncover what’s being done—or not—to address this ambient and ultimately controllable killer.

India's Anna Hazare: A Gandhian for Today?

Anna Hazare, inspired by Gandhi, transformed a village—Ralegan Siddhi, his hometown. Now, 74 years old, he wants to rid his country of corruption using the same tactics of non-violent resistance.

Agriculture and Jamaica’s Rural Poor

This project looks at the paradox of Jamaican agriculture: an abundant supply of fish, fruits and vegetables while farmers struggle to find financial success.

Colombian Communities Are Losing Out in Gold Rush

Colombia's small-scale traditional miners are fighting for their piece of the recent gold mining boom as large multinational companies have picked up most of the country's exploration rights.

China's Fragile Forests

Natural forests cover about 10 percent of China’s surface area, but large swathes of China’s forests have been destroyed as a result of logging, mining, wood and plant collection.

Egypt: The Revolution Continues

In the wake of the uprising that ousted President Mubarak, Sharif Abdel Kouddous reports from Cairo, Egypt with Nicole Salazar on the struggle for democracy, social justice and economic reform.

Ghana: Oil City Stories

In December 2010, Ghana joined the league of oil-producers, determined to make oil a blessing and not a curse. Christiane Badgley visits Takoradi, a.k.a. Oil City to see how things are going so far.

El Salvador: Fighting Drugs with Guns

President Obama wants to put U.S.-Latin America relations on a new path. But his drug and security policies indicate that the more the U.S. stance toward the region changes, the more it stays the same.

Loretta Tofani interviews with the Washington Observer

Editor in Chief Lily Chen interviews Pulitzer Center grant-recipient Loretta Tofani about her "American Imports, Chinese Deaths" series. January 9, 2008, the Washington Observer (Mandarin Chinese), a World Security Institute publication. Lily interviews Loretta Tofani, an American journalist, about her call for people's attention to Chinese workers' benefits and rights.

Note: This article is in Mandarin Chinese.

OneWorld.net highlights Jason Motlagh's India project

OneWorld highlighted the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting India project on September 27, 2007 in the Today's Newssection of its website. The mention reads, "Freelance journalist Jason Motlagh unearths the India beyond Bollywood and the info-tech boom. Keep up with his blogs and photo reports on the country's rural poor, who are dealing with flooding and a four-decade-long guerrilla insurgency."

Paradise Lost, and Found? Panel and Reception, 05/02

Gorongosa National Park was once among the most popular destinations in Africa – a place where movie stars and astronauts vacationed, where animal herds were denser than on the famed Serengeti Plain. But Mozambique's long civil war turned this natural wonderland into a battlefield. By the time the war ended in 1992, Gorongosa was a wasted, abandoned, empty place – yet another African casualty in a century filled with tragedies.