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Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

South Africa's Toxic Legacy

South Africa has historically failed to properly regulate closure of the mines that helped build its economy. These photos chronicle the country's attempt to play catch up.

Picking Cotton in Burkina Faso

What would change for farmers in Burkina Faso who rely on manual labor if they knew they were competing against farmers in the U.S. who use machines for pressing cotton bales?

Sanctioned Casualties of War

When Dr. Hania Fadl opened the only breast cancer center in Sudan, she didn't expect to have to battle U.S. sanctions, bureaucratic red tape, and cultural norms to save women's lives.

South Africa: A Most Significant Threat

Five decades of mining on the Far West Rand outside Johannesburg contributed to the formation of more than 1,000 sinkholes. As companies abandon mines, many fear this will set off new sinkholes.

Guatemala: Forgotten Trauma

Samuel Loewenberg ventures to Guatemala to survey the underlying issues of the Central American country's extreme poverty. There, income inequality equals the worst in Africa - particularly among indigenous communities. In some regions, an estimated 75 percent of the children from infants to the ages of 6 and 7...

Tajikistan: Winter of Discontent

The global financial crisis is now reverberating deep inside the Tajikistan's mountainous countryside, where tens of thousands of Tajik men who no longer have jobs in Russia have returned to their villages. In a country already straining to accommodate Tajik refugees from Afghanistan, the government's chronic mismanagement has amplified the power and food shortages that permeate the countryside.

Myanmar: The Kachin Struggle For Freedom

The Himalayan foothills of northern Myanmar form the ancestral homeland of the Kachins, an ethnic group that has endured decades of brutal repression at the hands of the Burmese military. Starting in 1962, the Kachin Independence Organization (KIO) waged a low-grade insurgency against the Burmese military. Today, a tenuous...

Nigeria: Oil Rich But Hungry

Twenty-five years ago Abdullahi Tijjani had a vision for Kuki, a village in the north of Nigeria he became chief of at age 14: "Hunger will become a thing of the past once we marry modern technologies and traditional farming," he told reporter David Hecht when they met in...

Stalking a Wheat Killer

Ug99, a virulent fungal disease, could create a major food security crisis by attacking the world's second largest crop, wheat.

Vietnam: The Price of Rice

The doubling of the price of rice in Asia has given rise to what some have coined "the Asian Food Crisis." While some economists feel that this is a temporary price hike, others see that the devastation from the recent cyclone in the central rice growing region of Burma...

Guatemala: The Future of Petén

In the remote Petén region of northern Guatemala, environmentalists are fighting environmentalists in a behind-the-scenes ideological conflict over how best to save the vast but rapidly shrinking Maya forest.

American archaeologists, Guatemalan bankers and the country's government have aligned to support an ambitious plan to protect hundreds...

Afghanistan: Failure of Expectation

The Taliban is not the only threat facing Afghanistan. The rise in poppy cultivation places the country at risk of moving from narco-economy to narco-state, and as eradication efforts continue to prove wildly unsuccessful, the threat increases. Yet the reasons for poppy's growing influence in the country are not...

A Turkish Dilemma

A resurgent Turkey is shifting from a linchpin of the Western system to an independent-minded actor dominating the world's key geopolitical intersection, between Europe, the Middle East and Caucasus.

Turkey's regional might is greater today than at any other point since the formation of the modern Turkish...

American Imports, Chinese Deaths

Reporter Loretta Tofani gets inside America's factory, China, where the lack of health and safety precautions has Chinese workers dying.

In interviews with dozens of dying workers and through review of their medical records, she documents how Chinese workers routinely lose limbs from old machinery or develop fatal diseases...

India: Conflicts Within

Today Maoist insurgents keen to exploit the state's enduring weaknesses stalk the Hindu heartland. They are waging their "people's war" in under-policed areas where conditions are most fertile.

Loretta Tofani Wins Sigma Delta Chi Award for Investigative Reporting

Loretta Tofani won the 2007 Sigma Delta Chi Award for excellence in journalism for "American Imports, Chinese Deaths" published in The Salt Lake Tribune.

She won in the category of investigative reporting (circulation of 100,000 or greater). This year's winners were chosen by the Society of Professional Journalists from more than 1,000 entries of work published in 2007 in 48 categories including print, radio, television and online. The awards will be presented July 11 during the annual Sigma Delta Chi Awards banquet at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.

Loretta Tofani Wins IRE Gold Medal

Loretta Tofani's "American Imports, Chinese Deaths" series was awarded the 2007 Investigative Reporters and Editors' Gold Medal for medium sized newspapers.

Round One: Winning Essays

In March 2008, The Pulitzer Center partnered with Helium to launch its first round of the Global Issues/Citizen Voices Contest. Find the winning essays here.

Loretta Tofani interviews with the Washington Observer

Editor in Chief Lily Chen interviews Pulitzer Center grant-recipient Loretta Tofani about her "American Imports, Chinese Deaths" series. January 9, 2008, the Washington Observer (Mandarin Chinese), a World Security Institute publication. Lily interviews Loretta Tofani, an American journalist, about her call for people's attention to Chinese workers' benefits and rights.

Note: This article is in Mandarin Chinese.

OneWorld.net highlights Jason Motlagh's India project

OneWorld highlighted the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting India project on September 27, 2007 in the Today's Newssection of its website. The mention reads, "Freelance journalist Jason Motlagh unearths the India beyond Bollywood and the info-tech boom. Keep up with his blogs and photo reports on the country's rural poor, who are dealing with flooding and a four-decade-long guerrilla insurgency."

Paradise Lost, and Found? Panel and Reception, 05/02

Gorongosa National Park was once among the most popular destinations in Africa – a place where movie stars and astronauts vacationed, where animal herds were denser than on the famed Serengeti Plain. But Mozambique's long civil war turned this natural wonderland into a battlefield. By the time the war ended in 1992, Gorongosa was a wasted, abandoned, empty place – yet another African casualty in a century filled with tragedies.