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Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

In Brazil, Fires and Deforestation Threaten Amazon Species’ Survival

In the Amazon rainforest, record-breaking forest fires and ongoing deforestation threaten the survival of thousands of plant and animal species that call the ecosystem home. Scientists seeking to save them are carefully evaluating which areas of the vibrant Amazon biome to preserve—knowing many are already lost.

A Matter of Semantics: What Is Disaster?

In order to combat climate change, we need unilateral support from agencies and government offices. We also need voices from local citizens. However, in Peru, disconnection prevails.

Is France’s Groundbreaking Food-Waste Law Working?

A third of the world's food goes to waste, but France is attempting to do something about it. Since 2016, large grocery stores in the country have been banned from throwing away unsold food that could be given away.

How Much Are You Overpaying in Property Tax?

When Palmer Square, LLC recently wanted to sell their apartment building, they went through all the usual hoops that most homeowners are familiar with. But selling the property outright would have cost $65,000 in conveyance fee taxes, and annual property tax would bump up an additional $309,000 dollars per year.

Youth Narratives of the Greek Crisis

In a changing political and social environment Greek youth face the consequences of the debt crisis and at the same time re-examine their identity and values.

Panama: The New Conquistadors

A battle is being waged in the rainforests of Panama – between those who want to keep their way of life, and those who want economic growth. At stake: billions worth of precious metals.

Russia: On The Move

After 20 years of fading industry, rampant corruption, and no clear ideology, Russia is now on the move. Its young people are finding new homes in—and out—of the country.

Haiti: Sitting on a Gold Mine

Haiti’s north is rich with mineral deposits that could infuse millions into the nation’s ailing economy—but only if the government can regulate foreign mining giants and share the wealth.

Nicaragua Rewind

Back in power since 2007, Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega is leading what he claims is a “second phase of the Sandinista revolution.” Some fear Nicaragua is repeating a cycle of social unrest.

A Sharp Initiative

The Pulitzer Center and The College of William & Mary created a unique initiative to provide deeper global learning and storytelling experiences for students.

With support from William & Mary alumni, Anne and Barry Sharp, The College launched its Campus Consortium partnership in fall 2011 with the...

Announcing the 2009 Student Reporting Fellows!

Students at Campus Consortium member schools were eligible to apply for reporting fellowships of up to $2,000 each and the opportunity to work with the Pulitzer Center staff on an international reporting project. Listed below are the inaugural winners for 2009 and previews of their projects.

Ryan Libre workshops and events in California

Become a photographer for peace

From Chico Peace and Justice Center:

March 6-7, 2009

This workshop primarily focused on the art of photography and addressed the technical issues of photography. It emphasized getting it right "in camera" as opposed to post-processing, but both were covered.

Another goal of this workshops is to teach what you need to know to effectively continue teaching yourself.

Jason Motlagh at SIU Carbondale 2/16

Jason will share his experiences in reporting international conflicts. He will give lectures to students interested in international journalism/affairs with fresh information on global issues such as conflicts and the current social and political situations in countries he has covered.

Round six: Winning essay

In January 2009, the Pulitzer Center again partnered with Helium to produce the sixth round of the Global Issues/Citizen Voices writing contest. The Pulitzer Center provided writing prompts, challenging contestants to craft essays on pressing international issues of the day.

Top winner Anita Lahiri answered the following question:

Where will the greatest points of conflict arise in India's foreseeable future and how should India act to resolve these conflicts?

Loretta Tofani Named Daniel Pearl Award Finalist

Loretta Tofani was awarded $2,000 by a five judge panel at the Daniel Pearl Award for Outstanding International Investigative Reporting for her "American Imports, Chinese Deaths" reporting project. Formerly called the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) Award, the honor was renamed this year after Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter murdered in 2002 by Pakistani militants. Two teams of journalists were awarded $10,000 each and the title of the 2008 Daniel Pearl Award.

Jason Motlagh presents at Americans for Informed Democracy's Global Scholar Program

On June 30th, Jason Motlagh presented his reporting on India's internal conflicts to Americans for Informed Democracy's Global Scholar Program. The course seeks to give students a historical overview of international affairs and a background on the most important international institutions. It takes an in-depth look at globalization and the U.S. role in our increasingly globalized world.

Round three: Winning essays

In June 2008, The Pulitzer Center partnered with Helium to continue its third round of the Global Issues/Citizen Voices Writing Contest. Contestants chose topics for their essays from prompts related to different Pulitzer Center reporting projects. Find their winning essays below.

How does stigma and discrimination, as witnessed in Jamaica, perpetuate the global HIV/AIDS epidemic?
Read winning essay by Glynnis Hayward

Round Two: Winning Essays

In May 2008, the Pulitzer Center partnered with Helium to continue its second round of the Global Issues/Citizen Voices Writing Contest. Find the winning essays here.

Loretta Tofani Wins Michael Kelly Award

Loretta Tofani has won the 2008 Michael Kelly Award for her series "American Imports, Chinese Deaths."

The $25,000 award "honors a writer or editor whose work exemplifies a quality that animated Michael Kelly's career: the fearless pursuit and expression of truth." (Michael Kelly Award Press Release) Tofani was chosen from over 50 journalists for 2007 work published in U.S. newspapers and magazines.

Loretta Tofani Wins Sigma Delta Chi Award for Investigative Reporting

Loretta Tofani won the 2007 Sigma Delta Chi Award for excellence in journalism for "American Imports, Chinese Deaths" published in The Salt Lake Tribune.

She won in the category of investigative reporting (circulation of 100,000 or greater). This year's winners were chosen by the Society of Professional Journalists from more than 1,000 entries of work published in 2007 in 48 categories including print, radio, television and online. The awards will be presented July 11 during the annual Sigma Delta Chi Awards banquet at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.