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Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

South Africa's Toxic Legacy

South Africa has historically failed to properly regulate closure of the mines that helped build its economy. These photos chronicle the country's attempt to play catch up.

Picking Cotton in Burkina Faso

What would change for farmers in Burkina Faso who rely on manual labor if they knew they were competing against farmers in the U.S. who use machines for pressing cotton bales?

Sanctioned Casualties of War

When Dr. Hania Fadl opened the only breast cancer center in Sudan, she didn't expect to have to battle U.S. sanctions, bureaucratic red tape, and cultural norms to save women's lives.

Gold, Guns and Garimpeiros

As jittery investors have sought safe-haven investments in gold during the recession, the metal's price has soared on world markets.

Can Biotechnology Save Africa?

African farmers already struggle to grow sufficient maize, which is a thirsty, fertilizer-hungry crop. What will happen as the climate changes and the population grows?

South Asia: Economics of Security

"The Economics of Security" explores the threat of extremist violence in South Asia, especially Pakistan, and its possible remedies.

India: Water for All?

In September 2007, the government of Maharashtra, India, invited bids from private companies for the completion of the Nira-Deogarh water project in the Satara district of Maharashtra. The construction of the dam was completed some years prior to this, but canals for irrigation and distribution were not. It was...

Latvia: Coping with Economic Collapse

For more than a decade the ex-Soviet republic of Latvia was a poster child of seamless transition to a prosperous post-Communist world. It entered the European Union in 2004 and for several years thereafter posted one of Europe's highest growth rates, fueled by access to cheap credit and domestic...

Southern Africa: Sustainable Hunting?

The black rhino is emblematic of how civil war and corruption in Africa decimate endangered animal populations and rob local economies of potential sources of income. Black rhinos have declined from 65,000 in 1970 to 4,000 today due to crises in Mozambique, Angola, and, now, Zimbabwe.

Since...

Guatemala: Forgotten Trauma

Samuel Loewenberg ventures to Guatemala to survey the underlying issues of the Central American country's extreme poverty. There, income inequality equals the worst in Africa - particularly among indigenous communities. In some regions, an estimated 75 percent of the children from infants to the ages of 6 and 7...

Tajikistan: Winter of Discontent

The global financial crisis is now reverberating deep inside the Tajikistan's mountainous countryside, where tens of thousands of Tajik men who no longer have jobs in Russia have returned to their villages. In a country already straining to accommodate Tajik refugees from Afghanistan, the government's chronic mismanagement has amplified the power and food shortages that permeate the countryside.

Myanmar: The Kachin Struggle For Freedom

The Himalayan foothills of northern Myanmar form the ancestral homeland of the Kachins, an ethnic group that has endured decades of brutal repression at the hands of the Burmese military. Starting in 1962, the Kachin Independence Organization (KIO) waged a low-grade insurgency against the Burmese military. Today, a tenuous...

Ryan Libre workshops and events in California

Become a photographer for peace

From Chico Peace and Justice Center:

March 6-7, 2009

This workshop primarily focused on the art of photography and addressed the technical issues of photography. It emphasized getting it right "in camera" as opposed to post-processing, but both were covered.

Another goal of this workshops is to teach what you need to know to effectively continue teaching yourself.

Jason Motlagh at SIU Carbondale 2/16

Jason will share his experiences in reporting international conflicts. He will give lectures to students interested in international journalism/affairs with fresh information on global issues such as conflicts and the current social and political situations in countries he has covered.

Round six: Winning essay

In January 2009, the Pulitzer Center again partnered with Helium to produce the sixth round of the Global Issues/Citizen Voices writing contest. The Pulitzer Center provided writing prompts, challenging contestants to craft essays on pressing international issues of the day.

Top winner Anita Lahiri answered the following question:

Where will the greatest points of conflict arise in India's foreseeable future and how should India act to resolve these conflicts?

Loretta Tofani Named Daniel Pearl Award Finalist

Loretta Tofani was awarded $2,000 by a five judge panel at the Daniel Pearl Award for Outstanding International Investigative Reporting for her "American Imports, Chinese Deaths" reporting project. Formerly called the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) Award, the honor was renamed this year after Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter murdered in 2002 by Pakistani militants. Two teams of journalists were awarded $10,000 each and the title of the 2008 Daniel Pearl Award.

Jason Motlagh presents at Americans for Informed Democracy's Global Scholar Program

On June 30th, Jason Motlagh presented his reporting on India's internal conflicts to Americans for Informed Democracy's Global Scholar Program. The course seeks to give students a historical overview of international affairs and a background on the most important international institutions. It takes an in-depth look at globalization and the U.S. role in our increasingly globalized world.

Round three: Winning essays

In June 2008, The Pulitzer Center partnered with Helium to continue its third round of the Global Issues/Citizen Voices Writing Contest. Contestants chose topics for their essays from prompts related to different Pulitzer Center reporting projects. Find their winning essays below.

How does stigma and discrimination, as witnessed in Jamaica, perpetuate the global HIV/AIDS epidemic?
Read winning essay by Glynnis Hayward

Round Two: Winning Essays

In May 2008, the Pulitzer Center partnered with Helium to continue its second round of the Global Issues/Citizen Voices Writing Contest. Find the winning essays here.

Loretta Tofani Wins Michael Kelly Award

Loretta Tofani has won the 2008 Michael Kelly Award for her series "American Imports, Chinese Deaths."

The $25,000 award "honors a writer or editor whose work exemplifies a quality that animated Michael Kelly's career: the fearless pursuit and expression of truth." (Michael Kelly Award Press Release) Tofani was chosen from over 50 journalists for 2007 work published in U.S. newspapers and magazines.

Loretta Tofani Wins Sigma Delta Chi Award for Investigative Reporting

Loretta Tofani won the 2007 Sigma Delta Chi Award for excellence in journalism for "American Imports, Chinese Deaths" published in The Salt Lake Tribune.

She won in the category of investigative reporting (circulation of 100,000 or greater). This year's winners were chosen by the Society of Professional Journalists from more than 1,000 entries of work published in 2007 in 48 categories including print, radio, television and online. The awards will be presented July 11 during the annual Sigma Delta Chi Awards banquet at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.