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Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

North Korea: A High Price

Shopping at a supermarket in Pyongyang is unlike other activities in the Hermit Kingdom or shopping nearly anywhere else in the world.

A Global Sand Mining Crisis

Sand is a crucial material for making concrete, asphalt, and glass — the building blocks of our cities. The worldwide construction boom is causing widespread environmental damage.

Glazing and Health as Family Affairs

In La Victoria, Ecuador, alternatives to lead glazing of tiles and painting bowls with gasoline in La Victoria are not perfect, but their intentions—healthy children—are great.

History of the Present: Mexico City

An unpopular president, a myth-making architect, and a multibillionaire tycoon are building an oversize airport in a nature preserve. Can they make Mexico great again?

A Sharp Initiative

The Pulitzer Center and The College of William & Mary created a unique initiative to provide deeper global learning and storytelling experiences for students.

With support from William & Mary alumni, Anne and Barry Sharp, The College launched its Campus Consortium partnership in fall 2011 with the...

One Year After the Revolution, Where Is Tunisia Heading?

On the one-year anniversary of the Tunisian revolution, a nation struggles with the transition from autocracy to democracy in the face of growing unemployment and religious conservatism.

Palestinian Youth at a Crossroads

With the economy slowing and the peace process in stagnation, the West Bank's younger generation is at a political crossroad.

India's Anna Hazare: A Gandhian for Today?

Anna Hazare, inspired by Gandhi, transformed a village—Ralegan Siddhi, his hometown. Now, 74 years old, he wants to rid his country of corruption using the same tactics of non-violent resistance.

Agriculture and Jamaica’s Rural Poor

This project looks at the paradox of Jamaican agriculture: an abundant supply of fish, fruits and vegetables while farmers struggle to find financial success.

Colombian Communities Are Losing Out in Gold Rush

Colombia's small-scale traditional miners are fighting for their piece of the recent gold mining boom as large multinational companies have picked up most of the country's exploration rights.

China's Fragile Forests

Natural forests cover about 10 percent of China’s surface area, but large swathes of China’s forests have been destroyed as a result of logging, mining, wood and plant collection.

From Drought to Flood - Water Images Across the Globe

Water issues affect us all, from the women who spend hours daily fetching water to political battles over international rivers to melting icepack and rising sea levels. We are all downstream.

Worldwide, just under 900 million people lack reliable access to safe water that is free from disease and industrial waste. And forty percent do not have access to adequate sanitation facilities. The result is one of the world's greatest public health crisis: 4,500 children die every day from waterborne diseases, more than from HIV-AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis combined.

Jason Motlagh Wins National Magazine Award for Digital Media

The Virginia Quarterly Review was awarded the National Magazine Award for Digital Media in the News Reporting category for Jason Motlagh's, "Sixty Hours of Terror" a four-part series covering the November 2008 Mumbai attacks.

The National Magazine Awards (known as the "Ellies") are presented by the American Society of Magazine Editors and the Journalism School at Columbia University. This is their first year to honor achievements in digital media.

Letter from India: A Refinery or a Village's Existence

Inside the shade of a tribal hut in rural India, I am listening to Devudama tell her story in Telugu. Our translator sits between us with the neighbor's baby on her lap while the neighbor chats with a friend. The baby is busily gumming our translator's arm. Two dogs sleep in the sun, and children's clothing is drying on the slanted, low-hanging roof of the opposite hut.

Haiti in Crisis

Mark Stanley, Pulitzer Center

The worst earthquake to strike Haiti in 200 years rattled the country yesterday, leaving the infrastructure in shambles and thousands dead. The quake hit just as many believed Haiti was achieving some semblance of stability; relative political repose under President René Préval and heavy United Nations presence enabled economic growth and promised increased foreign investments.

Pulitzer Center grantees Jason Maloney and Kira Kay recently reported on these hopeful developments. In their project on fragile states, they write:

In Focus: Foreign assistance in East Africa

The New York Times today covered East Africa's biggest new development: Plans are underway for construction of what will become the region's largest port in Lamu, Kenya. Promising swift growth for Lamu, a U.N. World Heritage site possessing rare traditional Swahili charm, the port will likely jump-start lagging regional economic development. But the boost may come at steep costs to environmental and cultural preservation.

Loretta Tofani Awarded "Special Citation" as Daniel Pearl Award Finalist

Loretta Tofani was awarded $2,000 by a five judge panel at the Daniel Pearl Award for Outstanding International Investigative Reporting for her "American Imports, Chinese Deaths" reporting project. Formerly called the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) Award, the honor was renamed this year after Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter murdered in 2002 by Pakistani militants. Two teams of journalists were awarded $10,000 each and the title of the 2008 Daniel Pearl Award.

"La Hoja" at Philanthropy New York's documentary film series 6/17

Pulitzer Center-supported documentary "La Hoya," Gabrielle Weiss' film about Bolivia's coca culture, was shown at the Philanthropy New York documentary series. This series invites funders, non-profit colleagues, and other friends to view award-winning documentaries that will help funders and other stakeholders think about alternative mediums for promoting their missions.

The Oscar-winning documentary "Smile Pinki" was also shown.

The event will be held at The Paley Center for Media in New York City.