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Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

A Journey to the Heart of 'Tropicapitalism'

It all started with the name “The Atlantic Conquest.” Who, in the 21st century, would think of such a name for a project to build a road through indigenous territory? Well, the Panamanian government did.

The Soul of Myanmar

Doug Bock Clark kayaked several hundred miles of the Irrawaddy River to find out how globalization has transformed Myanmar.

Atlantic Conquest

A highway across indigenous territories is the first phase of a project that threatens one of the last primary forest reserves in the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor.  How is it that a Dutch businessman is about to achieve what Christopher Columbus could not?

Brain Gain and Its New Beneficiaries

Traditional exporters of migrants have become importers, turning the old paradigm on its head. The recent "brain gain" has presented new opportunities – and challenges – for Brazil, China and others.

Afghanistan's Unsustainable Waters

Trans-boundary water tensions with Iran and Pakistan cast a shadow on the development of Afghanistan's mainly agricultural economy.

Europe's Siege on Democracy

Europe’s economic crisis has become intertwined with disturbing anti-democratic trends and the rise of extremist politics. Bill Wheeler looks at the fallout in Hungary and Greece.

Mexico: Emptying the World's Aquarium

The Sea of Cortez is—or was—a vast and lush underwater paradise. Industrial fishing operations are now decimating the sea's bounty. Tuna, red snapper, and shark are all but gone.

Russia’s Nuclear Renaissance

As a global debate rages over nuclear power's future as a safe and clean energy source, Russia is aggressively pursuing nuclear expansion at home and abroad.

Thailand's Trash: Is There Room For Sustainability?

In Thailand, one of the world's most rapidly developing countries, sustainability often takes the backseat to economic growth. But rising levels of pollution and depletion could be disastrous.

Youth Narratives of the Greek Crisis

In a changing political and social environment Greek youth face the consequences of the debt crisis and at the same time re-examine their identity and values.

Panama: The New Conquistadors

A battle is being waged in the rainforests of Panama – between those who want to keep their way of life, and those who want economic growth. At stake: billions worth of precious metals.

Russia: On The Move

After 20 years of fading industry, rampant corruption, and no clear ideology, Russia is now on the move. Its young people are finding new homes in—and out—of the country.

Haiti: Sitting on a Gold Mine

Haiti’s north is rich with mineral deposits that could infuse millions into the nation’s ailing economy—but only if the government can regulate foreign mining giants and share the wealth.

From Drought to Flood - Water Images Across the Globe

Water issues affect us all, from the women who spend hours daily fetching water to political battles over international rivers to melting icepack and rising sea levels. We are all downstream.

Worldwide, just under 900 million people lack reliable access to safe water that is free from disease and industrial waste. And forty percent do not have access to adequate sanitation facilities. The result is one of the world's greatest public health crisis: 4,500 children die every day from waterborne diseases, more than from HIV-AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis combined.

Jason Motlagh Wins National Magazine Award for Digital Media

The Virginia Quarterly Review was awarded the National Magazine Award for Digital Media in the News Reporting category for Jason Motlagh's, "Sixty Hours of Terror" a four-part series covering the November 2008 Mumbai attacks.

The National Magazine Awards (known as the "Ellies") are presented by the American Society of Magazine Editors and the Journalism School at Columbia University. This is their first year to honor achievements in digital media.

Letter from India: A Refinery or a Village's Existence

Inside the shade of a tribal hut in rural India, I am listening to Devudama tell her story in Telugu. Our translator sits between us with the neighbor's baby on her lap while the neighbor chats with a friend. The baby is busily gumming our translator's arm. Two dogs sleep in the sun, and children's clothing is drying on the slanted, low-hanging roof of the opposite hut.

Haiti in Crisis

Mark Stanley, Pulitzer Center

The worst earthquake to strike Haiti in 200 years rattled the country yesterday, leaving the infrastructure in shambles and thousands dead. The quake hit just as many believed Haiti was achieving some semblance of stability; relative political repose under President René Préval and heavy United Nations presence enabled economic growth and promised increased foreign investments.

Pulitzer Center grantees Jason Maloney and Kira Kay recently reported on these hopeful developments. In their project on fragile states, they write:

In Focus: Foreign assistance in East Africa

The New York Times today covered East Africa's biggest new development: Plans are underway for construction of what will become the region's largest port in Lamu, Kenya. Promising swift growth for Lamu, a U.N. World Heritage site possessing rare traditional Swahili charm, the port will likely jump-start lagging regional economic development. But the boost may come at steep costs to environmental and cultural preservation.

Loretta Tofani Awarded "Special Citation" as Daniel Pearl Award Finalist

Loretta Tofani was awarded $2,000 by a five judge panel at the Daniel Pearl Award for Outstanding International Investigative Reporting for her "American Imports, Chinese Deaths" reporting project. Formerly called the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) Award, the honor was renamed this year after Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter murdered in 2002 by Pakistani militants. Two teams of journalists were awarded $10,000 each and the title of the 2008 Daniel Pearl Award.