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Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

How Much Are You Overpaying in Property Tax?

When Palmer Square, LLC recently wanted to sell their apartment building, they went through all the usual hoops that most homeowners are familiar with. But selling the property outright would have cost $65,000 in conveyance fee taxes, and annual property tax would bump up an additional $309,000 dollars per year.

Are Your Tinned Tomatoes Picked by Slave Labor?

The Italian mafia makes millions by exploiting migrants. In the Italian south, the lives of foreign agricultural laborers are so cheap that many NGOs have described their conditions as a modern form of slavery.

A Cryptocurrency Rush In The Grey Zone

Why is there a rush for cryptocurrencies in places that don't exist? A story set in the post-Soviet space, where ultra-libertarianism meets kleptocracy and sanctions evasion.

Bolsonaro's Brazil

This series looks at the potential consequences of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro's pledges to expand deforestation in the Amazon

PBS NewsHour Weekend 'Future of Food' Series

Can we create a nutritious and affordable food system in a way that’s green and fair? PBS NewsHour Weekend’s "Future of Food" international series reports on work by people who think they have solutions.

Before Ferguson, Beyond Ferguson

Families of color have long been thwarted in finding a quality education. We present the saga of one St. Louis family, how they got educated and managed to gain their purchase on the American Dream.

Dairyland in Distress

Dairy farms—Wisconsin's economic engines—have been decimated in recent years due to decreased demand, lack of workers, and slumping milk prices.

Bolsonaro and the Brazilian Amazon

Under the presidency of Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil’s indigenous communities are bracing for an escalation of repression, encroachment, and displacement throughout the Amazon and the rainforest frontier.

The Last River

A series of reports on the threats and resistance activities linked to the defence of the last river free of large dams in the Tapajos river basin–now being strangled by a belt of deforestation and the constant expansion of agribusiness.

Japan's Demographic Reckoning

As Japan experiences its steepest population decline since record-keeping began in 1967, Emiko Jozuka examines how a historically inward-looking country will reimagine its future.

Meet the Journalist: Melissa McCart

Restaurateur Mike Chen legally hired expert noodle-pullers from Taiwan to create an authentic noodle house in Pittsburgh, until the Trump administration’s immigration policy changes put an end to it.

Meet the Journalist: Mark O'Connell

Mark O'Connell travels to New Zealand to investigate how an extremist libertarian manifesto from 1997 influenced Silicon Valley libertarians like Peter Thiel to acquire apocalypse boltholes in New Zealand.

Meet the Journalist: Estacio Valoi

Oxpeckers Investigative Environmental Journalism's Estacio Valoi discusses Kruger's contested borderlands and how he overcame the challenges of reporting in a remote zone by using new media tools.

Meet the Journalist: Daniel Brook

Daniel Brook reports on the building of instant, modern cities in the developing world and examines the effects of major infrastructure projects on citizens living in Mexico, China, and India.

This Week: Living on the Margins

This week: Economic despair drives migration to Moscow, the Catholic Church's response to Duterte's killings, and PBS NewsHour revisits reporting on the US's nuclear arsenal.

Privatizing Education in Africa

This week: for-profit schools in the most impoverished places; identifying bodies from the U.S.-Mexico border; and age-based asylum in Sweden.