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Economy

The international economy, shaped by governments, businesses and other actors, touches the lives of everyone in the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Economy” feature reporting that covers business, workers and the impact of global capitalism on people’s lives. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the economy.

 

A Mirage of Luxury Built on Sand

Magnum nominee Sim Chi Yin’s ongoing project, Shifting Sands, examines the global hunger for sand, and the ill-regulated, under-documented industry it has fed. 

Dairy in Distress

Dairy farms—Wisconsin's economic engines—have been decimated in recent years due to decreased demand, lack of workers, and slumping milk prices.

Japan's Demographic Reckoning

As Japan experiences its steepest population decline since record-keeping began in 1967, Emiko Jozuka examines how a historically inward-looking country will reimagine its future.

Burning Forest for the Trees

In the name of renewable energy, the British government is subsidizing the clear-cutting of the American Southeast.

China's Footprint in Pakistan

Will China's investment in Pakistan deliver the broad-based growth, prosperity, and jobs it promises? How will it reshape local politics, infrastructure, and the environment?

In These Hills, Our Gods and Our Futures

In Odisha in eastern India, Arko Datto and Raghu Karnad cover the resistance of Dongria Kondh women to industrial interests that want to exploit their sacred hills for bauxite reserves.

Helping the Poor: What Works in Rwanda?

Governments, foundations, and nonprofits aim to help the world's poorest people by giving them livestock, cash, training, and education. What works best? How do we know?

A Journey Through Contested Lands: Tanzania

A moving photo essay about the Maasai in northeast Tanzania, who are struggling to make a living on ancestral lands that the government keeps trying to take away.

Meet the Journalist: Melissa McCart

Restaurateur Mike Chen legally hired expert noodle-pullers from Taiwan to create an authentic noodle house in Pittsburgh, until the Trump administration’s immigration policy changes put an end to it.

Meet the Journalist: Mark O'Connell

Mark O'Connell travels to New Zealand to investigate how an extremist libertarian manifesto from 1997 influenced Silicon Valley libertarians like Peter Thiel to acquire apocalypse boltholes in New Zealand.

Meet the Journalist: Estacio Valoi

Oxpeckers Investigative Environmental Journalism's Estacio Valoi discusses Kruger's contested borderlands and how he overcame the challenges of reporting in a remote zone by using new media tools.

Meet the Journalist: Daniel Brook

Daniel Brook reports on the building of instant, modern cities in the developing world and examines the effects of major infrastructure projects on citizens living in Mexico, China, and India.

Meet the Journalist: Nate Tabak

How did a little village in Albania come be known as Europe's unofficial marijuana capital? Nate Tabak discusses his project about Lazarat, and the rise and fall of its marijuana business.

Meet the Journalist: Max Duncan

Filmmaker and video journalist Max Duncan introduces his project about a family from a remote corner of China. The parents left their children behind in order to give them a better future.

This Week: Living on the Margins

This week: Economic despair drives migration to Moscow, the Catholic Church's response to Duterte's killings, and PBS NewsHour revisits reporting on the US's nuclear arsenal.

Privatizing Education in Africa

This week: for-profit schools in the most impoverished places; identifying bodies from the U.S.-Mexico border; and age-based asylum in Sweden.