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Culture

Culture rests at the core of how people live their lives and experience the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Culture” feature reporting that covers knowledge, belief, art, morals, law and customs. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on culture.

 

Why China’s Art Market Is Evolving From Knockoffs to New Works

In the past, China was better known for producing 75 percent of the world’s art knockoffs than for its own creative innovation. Today, that is changing, as Chinese artists are reviving what they call the country’s “cultural aristocracy” by producing original art.

Jerusalem and the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process

Spending a day in the East Jerusalem's Muslim Quarter highlights the beauty of the Palestinain food culture, spotlights the Palestinian struggle, and personifies the daily clash of people, politics, and religion in one of the world's most disputed cities. 

 

Nablus: Food and Resistance

Nablus has garnered a storied reputation as a refuge for radicals and a symbol for Palestinian resistance. But it also holds some of the richest culinary and agricultural traditions in the West Bank.

Uganda: De-Normalizing Sexual Violence

Sexual violence is ingrained into Ugandan culture, largely due to its normalization in society. Finally, a powerful movement is underway to start the conversation about the issue in Uganda.

China: Power and Prosperity

PBS NewsHour has produced one of the most robust efforts about China by any American television program, covering everything from Belt and Road to the trade and technology wars to Xi Jinping to green vehicles.

No Journalism Left In Rural India?

More Indians live in rural areas than the entire population of Europe. What does it mean for them if journalism dies a painful death?

The Last River

A series of reports on the threats and resistance activities linked to the defence of the last river free of large dams in the Tapajos river basin–now being strangled by a belt of deforestation and the constant expansion of agribusiness.

Basketball in Tibet

On the Tibetan plateau, an unlikely group of nomads, Buddhist monks, and yak-wool artisans have seen their lives change—through basketball. Can they also help change Tibet?

Japan's Demographic Reckoning

As Japan experiences its steepest population decline since record-keeping began in 1967, Emiko Jozuka examines how a historically inward-looking country will reimagine its future.

American Origami

American Origami is a work of images and text that looks at the aftermath of mass shootings in American schools.

Visions of Justice

The “Visions of Justice” workshop immerses court involved youth in visual storytelling as a means to nurture self-expression, self-respect, and the exploration their ideas of freedom and justice.

Favela Ballet

A group of young ballerinas from one of the most violent favelas in Rio de Janeiro use dance to strive for a brighter future.

The Future of Family Planning in India

India will soon be the most populous country in the world. Innovators throughout the country are creating new tools to help families stay small while taking control of their reproductive destinies.

Meet the Journalist: Nate Tabak

How did a little village in Albania come be known as Europe's unofficial marijuana capital? Nate Tabak discusses his project about Lazarat, and the rise and fall of its marijuana business.

Meet the Journalist: Max Duncan

Filmmaker and video journalist Max Duncan introduces his project about a family from a remote corner of China. The parents left their children behind in order to give them a better future.

Meet the Journalist: Peter Gwin

How does a country fail? Peter Gwin spent three years traveling to the Central African Republic to look at how a rebellion destroyed the nation and what's happened to its wealth of resources.

Meet the Journalist: Negar Azimi

As new museums and universities are erected in the Gulf, Negar Azimi reports on the complexities surrounding the use of low-wage migrant labor, with a focus on a group of artist-activists.

This Week: Kingdom of Women

This Week: A village in China where women rule, an island off British Columbia was supposed to be an economic salvation, and illegal mining is causing problems for Venezuela.

This Week: Witch Hunts Today

This week: Indian women fight back against witch hunts, Bolivia's child labor laws struggle to combat abuse, and the lives of Filipino women whose government killed their loved ones for drug use.

Is There Really Religious Conflict?

This lesson challenges students to take a position related to what is causing or fueling conflicts that could be labeled religious. Students create an argumentative research paper and presentation.

International Adoption: Ethics and Effects

This is a multi-week unit on international adoption and ethics. Students will examine how international adoption agencies work and the role of culture, ethics, local policy, and international law.

Who Am I?

This multi-week unit for grades 3-5 on the Out of Eden project can be divided for individual lesson plans. Students explore human migration and its impact by generating digital media.

Religion and the Environment in China

Students analyze the structure and purpose of "Searching for Sacred Mountain," a 20-minute documentary that explores connections between Buddhism and environmental sustainability practices in China.