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Culture

Culture rests at the core of how people live their lives and experience the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Culture” feature reporting that covers knowledge, belief, art, morals, law and customs. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on culture.

 

Opinion: Let Women Be Warriors

Swedish women have joined the infantry for decades. The question is not whether women can be combat-effective, but whether a hypermasculine military culture can adjust.

The Remote Arctic Town That Is Melting Away

As the Arctic loses ice at dramatic rates, people in Qaanaaq, the northernmost town in Greenland, are finding their homes, livelihoods, customs, and very survival at risk.

El Salvador: Fighting Drugs with Guns

President Obama wants to put U.S.-Latin America relations on a new path. But his drug and security policies indicate that the more the U.S. stance toward the region changes, the more it stays the same.

Afghanistan by Donkey

During the year that is supposed to determine Afghanistan’s future, Anna Badkhen gives readers a longer look at a deeply fissured nation that has endured war almost incessantly for millennia.

A Soldier’s Gift

An American military medical facility has become one of the most active organ donor hospitals in Germany. That’s because a high percentage of mortally wounded U.S. troops are donating their organs in a country where organ donation is still a verboten topic.

Child Sacrifice in Uganda

Searing images capture a disturbing Ugandan trend -- the recent rise of charlatan priests and the child abuse and sometimes murder that have resulted. (This project contains graphic images that may not be suitable for all audiences.)

Nunavut, Canada: Hope on Ice

In the remote northern reaches of one of the wealthiest countries of the world is an aboriginal community whose young people are slowly perishing by suicide.

The Architect of 9/11

As an urban planning graduate student at the Hamburg University of Technology, Egyptian architect Mohamed Atta researched what he saw as the intrusions of Western modernist architecture.

Greenland: Languages on Thin Ice

In the arctic, warmer weather has already reshaped fauna and flora zones, and sea ice melted last year at the highest levels in modern history. In fact, some scientists believe that if such thawing continues, North Pole summers will be ice-free by the end of the century.

...

Human Terrain: The New Counterinsurgency?

Since 2007, an experimental Pentagon program has been sending teams of civilian anthropologists and other social scientists into the hardest-fought regions of Iraq and Afghanistan to pursue a mission that's both deeply controversial and increasingly important to U.S. military strategy.

Social scientists work within frontline combat units...

India: The Kerala Model

In few places has coexistence between Muslims and non-Muslims been more sorely tested as in India, yet few post-colonial nations can claim a more unlikely success. Kerala is an exceptionally diverse southern state: 32 million inhabitants, 56 percent Hindu, 25 percent Muslim, 19 percent Christian, plus a scattering of...

This Week: Mine Control

Chinese dollars and the Chinese themselves have been pouring into Africa, mining the continent’s abundant resources, opening businesses, building infrastructure and generally making everyone nervous.

Six Months After Newtown

June 14, 2013, marks the six-month anniversary of the Newtown massacre. Two grantees, both reporting from Chicago, examine that city's own ongoing culture of gun violence.

This Week in Review: Escape From Timbuktu

Tom Hundley shares this weeks reporting on the rare manuscripts smuggled from inside Timbuktu's hallowed libraries, child laborers in Burkina Faso and a conflict free tin mining initiative in the DRC.