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Culture

Culture rests at the core of how people live their lives and experience the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Culture” feature reporting that covers knowledge, belief, art, morals, law and customs. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on culture.

 

Musician Profile: Mohammed Alom

Alom left Myanmar for Malaysia when he was a teenager. He was deported about seven years later, but he couldn't go home because security forces had waged a genocidal campaign on his community.

Kristen Roupenian, ‘Cat Person’ & Viral Fiction

Indira Lakshmanan was a guest host on 1A, where she sat down with author Kristen Roupenian to discuss her popular short story "Cat Person," and her new book, You Know You Want This.

Children at Risk

Across the world more attention needs to be focused on children's needs so that girls as well as boys will attend school and learn to read, and that all will have safe water and access to healthcare.

A Sharp Initiative

The Pulitzer Center and The College of William & Mary created a unique initiative to provide deeper global learning and storytelling experiences for students.

With support from William & Mary alumni, Anne and Barry Sharp, The College launched its Campus Consortium partnership in fall 2011 with the...

India's Anna Hazare: A Gandhian for Today?

Anna Hazare, inspired by Gandhi, transformed a village—Ralegan Siddhi, his hometown. Now, 74 years old, he wants to rid his country of corruption using the same tactics of non-violent resistance.

Art and Politics in Post-Revolutionary Egypt

Pulitzer Center grantee Ty McCormick covers Egypt's political transformation by talking with artists who are beginning to show their creativity after years of forced self-censorship.

Libya: The Rebirth of a Nation

The revolution that toppled the regime of Col. Moammar Qaddafi brought Libya a sense of pride, hope and renewed engagement with the West, but ahead lies the challenge of building a democratic framework.

Los Ninis: Mexico's Lost Generation

Ciudad Juarez, across the border from El Paso, Texas, has become the murder capital of the world. Most vulnerable are Los Ninis , young men and women who earned their name from “ni estudian, ni trabajan”—those who neither work nor study.

Fragile States: The Drug War in Central America

Billionaire Mexican drug mafias are muscling into Central America, undermining the region’s feeble governments and bringing violence to levels not seen since the civil wars of the 1970s and 80s.

This Week: From Malawi to Scotland

“She went back to her village and decided to live as if nothing had happened. Four years later, she was married. She said her husband didn't know anything about her past."

Facing Global Public Health Head On

At Boston University student fellowships for reporting help humanize diverse global public health issues, from discrimination toward gays in Kenya to child marriage in Nepal.

This Week: Congo's Peacekeepers

Setting aside a dismal record of failure, incompetence and indifference, UN peacekeeping troops and the Democratic Republic of Congo's army seem to have finally joined forces to protect civilians.

This Week: The Lingering Disaster

Last April, the world was shocked and outraged by the Rana Plaza disaster—a building collapse that claimed the lives of more than 1,200 garment workers in a Dhaka sweatshop. Has anything changed?