Tags

Culture

Culture rests at the core of how people live their lives and experience the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Culture” feature reporting that covers knowledge, belief, art, morals, law and customs. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on culture.

 

Why China’s Art Market Is Evolving From Knockoffs to New Works

In the past, China was better known for producing 75 percent of the world’s art knockoffs than for its own creative innovation. Today, that is changing, as Chinese artists are reviving what they call the country’s “cultural aristocracy” by producing original art.

Jerusalem and the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process

Spending a day in the East Jerusalem's Muslim Quarter highlights the beauty of the Palestinain food culture, spotlights the Palestinian struggle, and personifies the daily clash of people, politics, and religion in one of the world's most disputed cities. 

 

Nablus: Food and Resistance

Nablus has garnered a storied reputation as a refuge for radicals and a symbol for Palestinian resistance. But it also holds some of the richest culinary and agricultural traditions in the West Bank.

Uganda: De-Normalizing Sexual Violence

Sexual violence is ingrained into Ugandan culture, largely due to its normalization in society. Finally, a powerful movement is underway to start the conversation about the issue in Uganda.

The Rebirth of the Shi'a-Sunni Divide

After years of the raging wars in Iraq and Syria, most people still think the conflicts are about territory and political power. But religious practice and belief have a lot to do with it.

Duterte and the Philippines

A new president is elected in the Philippines on a promise that he will crack down on drugs, dealers and users. Thousands of poor people have already been killed.

Latin America's Schindler

Roberto Kozak is virtually unknown. And yet this quiet man played a crucial role after the 1973 coup in Chile and he helped tens of thousands of prisoners out of custody and to find safe havens overseas.

Suggestible You

Inside our heads is an ancient power. A tool of miracle-workers, charlatans, witch doctors, hypnotists and physicians alike. It's a basic part of who we are. It's the hidden power of suggestibility.

Oji-Cree Youth: Connecting Cultures

For individuals and families living in the remote First Nations reserve of St. Theresa Point, life teeters between traditional expectations and encroaching Western influences, producing a lifelong tension.

Islam with Chinese Characteristics

China's Muslim minorities make up only two percent of the population, but comprise 20 million people. How do they relate to Islam, the state, the majority Han Chinese and one another?

Cuba and America: Honeymoon or Stalemate?

The US and Cuba are poised at the alter, prenuptials in hand. But as headlines forecast the fruits of the union and tourists flood Havana, there are already signs of unease.

Declining Violence in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico

A multimedia project about the psychology of violence. The project follows Diego, a former gang member, on his personal journey of reconciliation and redemption in Ciudad Juarez.

Meet Tim Judah

Scotland is expected to hold a referendum within the next two years on independence from the United Kingdom. Pulitzer Center grantee Tim Judah reports on the implications of a split.

Does Congo Really Need Us?

Some of the biggest criticisms of international aid are coming from self-reflective aid workers who question their role and the role of their employers in developing nations.

The Future of Democracy in China

Coming off of adventures in Asia during summer 2011, one traveler's questions shifted from whether China is ready for an Arab Spring to what the future of democracy looks like there.

This Week: Isolation in the Arctic

Growing Isolationism in the arctic, celebrating the Pulitzer Center's 10th anniversary, and India's dilemma of providing electricity to 1.3 billion people.