Tags

Culture

Culture rests at the core of how people live their lives and experience the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Culture” feature reporting that covers knowledge, belief, art, morals, law and customs. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on culture.

 

A Few Things to Know About Why Treaties Matter

The U.S. has ratified more than 370 treaties with American Indian nations. Yet many Americans know little about the treaties that shaped, and continue to impact, the country today.

Manipur: Portraits of Resilience

Portraits of Resilience takes viewers up close to nine individuals to understand the delicate relationship between the Meiteis and the Loktak Wetland as well as their fight for survival.

A Visit to Narok

Journalist Janelle Richards traveled to Narok, a mostly Maasai area located a few hours from Nairobi. In this blog post she writes about her experience conducting interviews in the area.

Pulitzer Center journalists cover Afghanistan

Tatum Taylor, Pulitzer Center

As the post-election drama continues and publicity over the US military's counterinsurgency strategies grows, journalists are increasingly turning their attention towards Afghanistan. Pulitzer Center journalists have been consistently reporting from Afghanistan in order to inform the conversation, and we wanted to share with you the range of their work.

Yes Weekly: Dawes and Simmonds’ genius elevates Hope Wisteria to unimaginable heights

Near the finale of Wisteria, a multimedia performance based on Kwame Dawes' poems about the memories and experiences of African-American women growing up in the segregated South, Dawes stepped away from the microphone inside Hanes Auditorium on the campus of Salem College. He then gazed upon the five singers, musical collaborator Kevin Simmonds and the seven-member ensemble that helped bring his poems to life with a look that could best be described as a mixture of reverence and pride.

Wisteria & HOPE review in the Winston-Salem Journal

Grand: The piece makes a wonderful whole

Pulitzer Center

Tim Clodfelter, The Winston-Salem Journal

Poet Kwame Dawes provided the words for HOPE & Wisteria, two back-to-back performance pieces that explore different aspects of the black experience. But his contribution, vital as it is, is only one part of the puzzle. Each production is a multimedia piece using music, images and Dawes' poetry.

"A feast for the eyes and ears," Wisteria & HOPE in the News and Observer

WINSTON-SALEM -- Poetry, music and photography combine to explore HIV/AIDS in Jamaica and the experiences of Southern black women in "Wisteria & HOPE," a dual production tonight at the National Black Theatre Festival.

The evening opens with "Wisteria," based on a series of poems that Kwame Dawes, the University of South Carolina distinguished poet, wrote in 1995 to document the lives of African-American women.

HOPE: Excerpts from the National Black Theatre Festival

HOPE is a multimedia performance based on poems by Kwame Dawes, poet in residence at the University of South Carolina and set to music by composer Kevin Simmonds. The work grew out of a Pulitzer Center commission to report on the impact of HIV/AIDS on Jamaica, the country where Kwame Dawes grew up. While in Jamaica Dawes wrote poems in response to the stories he heard.

Wisteria & HOPE on the cover of Winston-Salem Journal's Relish section

Published: July 30, 2009

Images, music and the words of poet Kwame Dawes will be featured in two multimedia productions being shown together as part of this year's National Black Theatre Festival.

Wisteria is about a group of women who grew up in the American South in the years before the civil rights movement. HOPE: Living & Loving With HIV in Jamaica follows people coping with HIV/AIDS in modern day.

Kwame Dawes launches Hope's Hospice

Join Kwame Dawes on July 12 to celebrate the launch of his new book of poetry, Hope's Hospice, inspired by the people he met while reporting on HIV/AIDS in Jamaica for the Pulitzer Center. The event will be held at 11 am at the University of the West Indies in Mona, Jamaica.

Kwame Dawes' work will also be showcased at the National Black Theatre Festival in Winston-Salem, NC on August 6 and 7. Learn more about this event and how to attend.